How to title a hot rod

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Contents

[edit] Overview

Title california.jpg

How to title a hot rod, in 50 US states and various countries.

[edit] United States

  • NHTSA Vehicle Importation and Certification Requirements

[edit] Alabama

If you custom-build a car in Alabama, from a kit or from parts, you must first apply for a vehicle identification number (VIN) before applying for a title. You may apply for a VIN using Form MVT 26-3, which is available at your local tag office. Return the completed form to the tag office with the documents listed below. The Department of Public Safety will then issue a VIN plate. The department will contact you to bring the assembled vehicle to a specified inspection station.

After the inspection, if everything is satisfactory, you and the DPS will need to complete more forms. When they are approved, you will be issued a certificate of title with the legend "ASSEMBLED."

[edit] Cars built from kits

For 1975 or newer kits that are assembled with a chassis built before 1974, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • A certified manufacturer's certificate of origin for a new kit assigned to you.
  • A certified copy of the most recent registration receipt in the applicant's name for the chassis, or a notarized bill of sale to the applicant, specifying the purchase of the chassis.
  • A bill of sale for each major component if purchased separately. The bill of sale needs to have the serial number and trade name of the part purchased.
  • A notarized affidavit from the person who assembled the car stating what was done to assemble it, and certifying that it is now in operable condition.

For 1975 kits assembled with 1975 or newer parts, you will need the following:

  • Certified manufacturer's certificate of origin for a new kit assigned to you.
  • The outstanding certificate of title in your name or assigned to you for the chassis, or the bill of sale to you for the chassis.
  • The bill of sale for any major components purchased separately. The bill of sale needs to state the serial number and trade name of the part purchased.
  • A notarized affidavit from the person who assembled the car stating what was done to assemble it, and certifying that it is now in operable condition.

[edit] Cars built from parts

For cars built with a 1974 or earlier chassis, you will need the following documents:

  • A certified copy of the most recent registration receipt in your name for the vehicle from which the chassis was removed, or a bill of sale for the chassis. The bill of sale needs to include the VIN number of the vehicle from which the chassis was removed.
  • A bill of sale for any major components purchased separately, containing the serial number and trade name of the part.
  • A notarized affidavit from the person assembling the car stating what was done to assemble the vehicle, and certifying that it is now in operable condition.

For cars built with a 1975 or newer chassis, provide the following:

  • Outstanding certificate of title in your name for the vehicle from which the chassis was removed, or a notarized bill of sale in your name. This bill of sale needs to contain the VIN number of the vehicle from which the chassis was removed.
  • A notarized bill of sale for each major component purchased, including the serial number and trade name of each part.
  • A notarized affidavit from the person who assembled the car stating what was done to assemble it, and certifying that it is now in operable condition.

[edit] Major components

Remember to keep all your receipts while building your car. You'll need to provide the bill of sale showing the serial number and trade name of the part for the following components:

  • Motor or engine
  • Transmission or transaxle
  • Trunk floor pan or rear section and roof
  • Frame or any portion thereof
  • Cowl, firewall, or any portion thereof
  • Roof assembly
  • Cab
  • Cargo compartment floor panel or passenger compartment floor pan
  • Front fork
  • Crankcase

[edit] Alaska

Alaska has certain requirements for the registration and titling of custom, rebuilt or altered vehicles. The Alaska DMV defines a custom built vehicle as:

"A vehicle that has been materially altered from the original constructed vehicle by the removal, addition, or substitution of essential parts. Essential parts are considered to be the chassis, body, and engine."

Keep in mind that replacing an engine, transmission, or any other major component does not qualify a vehicle as a custom, so you may register and title it in the usual way.

[edit] Registering vs. titling

Registering and titling a motor vehicle are two different things:

  • Registering a vehicle is, in effect, "signing it up" with the DMV. When you register, your license plates are issued and the vehicle is made legal for driving in Alaska. When you renew a registration, you are paying to ongoing fees each year that allow you legally drive the vehicle. Registration is then an ongoing, annual responsibility. Also, any I/M inspections are part of the registration process.
  • Titling a vehicle is the process of creating legal proof of your ownership of the vehicle. Titling is usually only one time, unless you change the legal status of the vehicle by adding an owner to the title (in case of marriage, etc) or removing an owner from the title of a vehicle. Titles can also change when a loan is paid and a lien is release; and, of course, when a vehicle is bought or sold. In most cases, you have 30 days from the date of purchase to change the title on a vehicle in Alaska.

[edit] Registering a custom vehicle

The secret to an easy registration and titling process for your custom or home built vehicle is all in the paperwork. Keep every paper related to the original vehicle or vehicles, purchases of any large components, salvage certificates, junkyard receipts or any other documentation that can prove the origin of any major components.

Here are the items and the steps you will need to complete in order to register and title your custom or home built vehicle:

  • The title for the original vehicle from which the chassis of the custom was taken must be surrendered to the DMV when the custom vehicle is registered, unless it has already been surrendered.
  • Any and all receipts, bills of sale invoices for the major components or parts used in the building of the custom must be presented to the DMV.
  • The vehicle will need to be inspected by either the DMV or by a law enforcement officer or a representative of the Division of Motor Vehicles.
  • A lien release if there is a lien recorded against the vehicle.
  • A completed and notarized Reconstructed Vehicle Affidavit, completed by the person who did the actual reconstruction of the vehicle; submit that with the other paperwork outlined above.

[edit] Vehicle inspections

Vehicle inspections are conducted in order to verify the vehicle identification number, and to confirm the identity of the vehicle; this helps stop "chop shop" operations and can assist in the recovery of stolen vehicles.

[edit] Arizona

If one has the VIN, and a Manufacturers Certificate of Origin, the only thing needed is to pay car value sales tax. And the registration cost, to transfer the title from the manufacturer to the owner. On my kit 23 T Bucket it cost approx. $1400.00. And took about two hours at the MVD, with only a verification of the vehicle.

If you are having problems getting your hotrod titled you can try a third party DMV, usually they can do it with less hassle. The state-run DMV's don't want the headache.

[edit] Arkansas

There are three methods available to title a hot rod in Arkansas. Which one to use depends upon the vehicle, it's title history and personal preference.

1.Bonded title

In this method the owner must first get a form signed by a licensed police officer verifying the VIN of the vehicle to be titled. The owner must then file with the state for a bonded title.When the state returns a “Letter of approval” and assigns a value to the vehicle the owner must then post a bond with a corporate surety bond, certificate of deposit with assignment, or an irrevocable letter of credit filed with the Commissioner within thirty (30) days from its effective date, for an amount equal to one and one half (1-1/2) times the value of the vehicle as determined by the Commissioner. The bond,certificate of deposit and assignment or letter of credit shall be delivered to the Commissioner, and accompanied by:

(a) an application for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to the vehicle signed by the vehicle owner;
(b) a letter from the Commissioner granting authorization to apply for a bonded title;
(c) any additional documentation otherwise necessary to comply with specific statutory requirements for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle (the form from the police officer being part of this);
(d) the payment of all requisite fees and taxes for the registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle.

A bonded title will then be issued.

2. Petition to quiet title.

Citizens of certain counties can petition the county court to have a judge "quiet the title". This also requires the the owner to first get a form signed by a licensed police officer verifying the VIN of the vehicle to be titled. Afterward a petition is filed for quiet title with the court. In Boone County this petition costs $150. It requires the bill of sale and the appropriate forms.

3. Manufactured vehicle

Under Arkansas DMV regulations a vehicle can be assembled from a body or frame of a previously registered vehicle and the body or frame of another provided that you have one vehicle registered and have appropriate documentation (registration or bill of sale) for the other. The resulting vehicle is considered a "manufactured vehicle" and is registered like any other vehicle.

Recently, Arkansas has enacted a Street Rod/Custom Vehicle Bill modeled after the SEMA model:

"The new law allows for the use of non-original materials, provides for special license plates and permits the use of blue dot tail lights. In addition, the measure exempts street rods and customs from a range of standard equipment requirements and emissions controls (only that equipment required in the model year that the vehicle resembles). Vehicles titled and registered as street rods and custom vehicles may only be used for occasional transportation, exhibitions, club activities, parades, tours, etc. and not for general daily transportation" (SEMA SAN - SEMA Action Network Mar. 31, 2007)

[edit] Further documentation:

Agency 006.05 Regulation 1993-3 Bonded Title Regulation Pursuant to authority given the Commissioner of Revenues by subsection (b) of section 20 of Act 142 of 1949 (Ark. Code Ann. §27-14-403 (b)), after the effective date of this regulation, corporate surety bonds, certificates of deposit with assignment and irrevocable letters of credit which meet the requirements of this regulation may be accepted under those circumstances where a bond is authorized under the provisions of subsection (c) of section 1 of Act 1013 of 1993 [Ark. Code Ann. §§27-14-409 (c)].

(1) Definitions:

(A) “Bond” means any corporate surety bond, certificate of deposit or irrevocable letter of credit approved by the Commissioner and given for the purpose of indemnifying any prior owner or lien holder and any subsequent purchaser of a vehicle, or person acquiring any security interest in it, and their respective successors in interest, heirs, or assigns, against any expense, loss or damage, including reasonable attorney’s fees, by reason of the issuance of the certificate of title to the vehicle or on account of any defect in or undisclosed security interest upon the right, title and interest of the applicant in and to the vehicle.
(B) “Bonded Title” means a certificate of title to a vehicle issued upon the condition that a bond is filed with the Commissioner of Revenues pursuant to Act 1013 of 1993 [Ark. Cod Ann. §§27-14-409 (c)].
(C) “Insurer” means any person with a valid certificate of authority, issued by the Arkansas Insurance Commissioner which certificate grants the authority to become surety on contacts in the State of Arkansas, or any other guarantor approved by the Commissioner of Revenues.
(D) “Vehicle” means any vehicle of a type required to be registered and titled in Arkansas, and which is in the possession of and legally controlled by the applicant for bonded title. This definition shall specifically exclude the following:
(i) Vehicles issued a junking certificate, or similarly branded certificate of title, as referenced in subsection (c) of section 2. of Act 614 of 1993;
(ii) Vehicles for which a person holds a storage or mechanic’s lien under the provisions of Act 1000 of 1993, [Arkansas Code Annotated §27- 50-1201, et. seq.], or Arkansas Code Annotated §18-45-201, et. seq.;
(iii) Stolen vehicles;
(iv) Vehicles involved in ownership litigation.
(E) “Statement of fact” means a form prescribed by the Commissioner, to be completed by the applicant for bonded title and filed with the Commissioner prior to the filing of a bond, so that a determination can be made as to the eligibility of the applicant for issuance of a bonded title.
(F) “Letter of approval” means a letter issued by the Commissioner to the applicant for bonded title granting approval to file a bond and apply for registration and issuance of a bonded title, and establishing the amount of the bond to be filed.

(2) After the effective date of this regulation, any bond filed pursuant to Act 1013 of 1993 [Ark. Code Ann. §§27-14-409 (c)] must guarantee payment, for a period of three (3) years from its effective date, to any prior owner or lienholder and any subsequent purchaser of a vehicle, or person acquiring any security interest in it, and their respective successors in interest, heirs or assigns against any expense, loss or damage, including reasonable attorney’s fees, by reason of the issuance of the certificate of title to the vehicle or an account of any defect in or undisclosed security interest upon the right, title and interest of the applicant in and to the vehicle.

(3) A bond filed pursuant to Act 1013 of 1993 [Ark. Code Ann. §§27-14-409 (c)] shall not be accepted unless it is a corporate surety bond, certificate of deposit with assignment, or an irrevocable letter of credit filed with the Commissioner within thirty (30) days from its effective date, for an amount equal to one and one half (1 ½) times the value of the vehicle as determined by the Commissioner, and meets the following requirements:

(A) “Corporate Surety Bond”: A corporate surety bond shall:
(i) be on forms approved by the Commissioner;
(ii) be issued by an insurer;
(iii) be irrevocable for a period three (3) years;
(iv) be signed by the vehicle owner (applicant for bonded title to a vehicle), and payable to the State of Arkansas upon presentation of a judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction as a result of the issuance of a bonded title;
(v) be signed by the insurer or its licensed agent or broker with power of attorney to act on behalf of the insurer and countersigned as otherwise required by law;
(vi) be delivered to the Commissioner, and accompanied by:
(a) an application for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to the vehicle signed by the vehicle owner;
(b) a letter from the Commissioner granting authorization to apply for a bonded title;
(c) the original power of attorney of the person executing on the behalf on the insurer, if applicable;
(d) any additional documentation otherwise necessary to comply with specific statutory requirements for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle;
(e) the payment of all requisite fees and taxes for the registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle.
(B) “Certificate of Deposit with Assignment”:
(i) The certificate of deposit and assignment shall both be on forms approved by the Commissioner.
(ii) The certificate of deposit shall:
(a) be signed by the assignor;
(b) be issued by a bank or savings and loan:
(c) be irrevocable for a period three (3) years.
(iii) The assignment shall:
(a) be signed by the assignor;
(b) be acknowledged by the financial institution;
(c) contain an irrevocable appointment of the Commissioner which allows him to endorse the certificate of deposit and apply the proceeds to any and all valid claims against the bonded title, as determined by a court of competent jurisdiction;
(d) provide the assignment of the certificate of deposit is to be held by the Commissioner for a period of three (3) years from the date of delivery to the Commissioner.
(iv) The certificate of deposit and assignment shall be delivered to the Commissioner, and accompanied by:
(a) an application for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to the vehicle signed by the vehicle owner;
(b) a letter from the Commissioner granting authorization to apply for a bonded title;
(c) any additional documentation otherwise necessary to comply with specific statutory requirements for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle;
(d) the payment of all requisite fees and taxes for the registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle.
(C) “Irrevocable Letter of Credit”. An irrevocable letter of credit shall:
(i) be in a form as prescribed by the Commissioner;
(ii) be issued by a bank or savings and loan;
(iii) be an irrevocable letter of credit;
(iv) be titled or conspicuously state that it is an irrevocable letter of credit;
(v) state that it may be drawn against to satisfy any judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction as a result of the issuance of a bonded title;
(vi) state that any draft drawn by the Commissioner against the letter of credit is payable upon presentation of a judgment issued by a court of competent jurisdiction as a result of the issuance of a bonded title;
(vii) be irrevocable for a period of three (3) years from the date it is delivered to the Commissioner;
(viii) be delivered to the Commissioner, and accompanied by:
(a) an application for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to the vehicle signed by the vehicle owner;
(b) a letter from the Commissioner granting authorization to apply for a bonded title;
(c) any additional documentation otherwise necessary to comply with specific statutory requirements for registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle;
(d) the payment of all requisite fees and taxes for the registration and issuance of a certificate of title to a vehicle.

(4) Procedure for applying for issuance of a bonded title: When a bonded title transaction is received by a State Revenue Office, the transaction should be examined to ensure that:

(A) The corporate surety bond, certificate of deposit with assignment or irrevocable letter of credit has been issued for an amount equal to or exceeding the amount determined by the Department.
(B) The bond is effective for a period of three (3) years from the date of issuance.
(C) The application for bonded title has been made within 30 days from the effective date of the bond.
(D) An application presented more than 30 days after the effective date of the bond shall not be accepted.
(E) The vehicle description (year, make, model, vehicle identification number, body style) reflected on the application matches the vehicle description reflected on the bond.

Executed this 23 rd day of July, 1993. Jim Pledger, Director Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration Tim Leathers Commissioner of Revenues Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

[edit] California

I have an old Chevy and couldn't find the numbers anywhere. To avoid all the problems that come with registration, I simply stamped the number off of my engine on the frame.... Called a policeman I knew and had him verify the number. Took it to DMV and the registration went right through.

You have to be very careful with the titling of an unregistered car in California. If you make the mistake of putting a late model engine in an older car and make the mistake of telling the DMV that you have a '85 engine in your '37 Chevy/Ford, etc, they will make you put all of the smog equipment for a '85 model car on your old car. I have had two friends get caught in this trap, one guy told the examiner that the engine was a '95 Chevy...OOP's, he had to put everything that was required for a '95 Chevy on his '37 Ford.

The best thing to do is get the legal paper work straightened out before you ever do any work on the car, then file a non-op on the car, when you get it running you send in proof of insurance and the renewal fees. No questions, no inspections, no hassle.

Also you can find a "vehicle verifier", usually at a dealership. Ask for the title/licensing desk, or talk to the used car manager. He will usually help if you grease the skids ($100 bill). All he needs is the paperwork. Ask the title desk what they need.

Or if you wish to get technical get a copy of the California vehicle code. I did, read it and was ARMED.

It should be noted however that submitting a fraudulent document such as a false verification in California is a FELONY and prosecutions do occur when the DMV Investigations branch discovers these. It happens more often than you might think - just because it did not happen to someones 'buddy' does not mean it will not happen to you. This is especially true in the case of kit Shelbys and similar vehicles - They have caught on to that.

Also if DMV decides it wants to it can ask that the owner obtain a CHP verification and be issued a 'blue tag' verification number - and those guys are not easily fooled - and for goodness sake do not try and slip them a $100, it will certainly end you in jail - I am one of them and people have tried and they have ended up on the wrong side of the bars!!

I would suggest going to AAA to handle your paperwork, as they're on your side and want to make this process as easy as possible. Should there be any snags, as there were in my case, you're hopefully not in the state system enough to have to go to the CHP to verify things. I'd avoid them like the plague. At the very least its going to be a hassle. There are many title registration services in the Los Angeles area, I'd strongly suggest using one of them. It may be the best $150 or so that you spend, as in my case I never had to set foot in the dmv office and got everything taken care of within 2 weeks.

[edit] Another perspective

First of all you need a bill of sale or receipts for all of the major components, body, frame, motor, transmission and or rear ends. They will accept an eBay page showing you bought the things you say you did. If not a receipt, you have a statement of facts that you can fill out telling where you acquired the part, and how much you spent for it.

The DMV has an application for registration and title of a newly constructed vehicle. You fill out all the paperwork, attach your bills of sale, and go to DMV. They will charge you the sales tax, and issue you a temporary registration for whatever you wrote down on the application. If you do not have a serial number on the body or frame, then this will have to be verified by the CHP.

Call the CHP with your paperwork, and they will assign you to a vehicle verification officer, somewhere in the county that you reside. Normally, it takes about 6 weeks to get an appointment, depending on where you are in california.

You take all the papers to the CHP, and they simply check that all the motor numbers, frame numbers and so forth match the paperwork that you provided. If the "street rod" does not have any numbers, then they will issue you a CA identification number, which is a blue metal sticker they will affix to the door jamb, firewall, or frame of the car you are registering.

They sign off on the correct forms, you take this back to the DMV, and they will then issue you your plates, and a few weeks later, your title.

It is important that you use a pre 75 motor, if you want to avoid smog. If you use a later motor, the "new construction" car will have to go by the smog rules for the year of the motor. IE, you put in a 1995 motor, you will have to have all of the smog equipment for that year of motor. If you do not agree, then you can go to the BAR refereee people, and get a judgment about what year your car is, and what smog you have to have done. If you use a pre smog motor, you will avoid all of that.

I stress here that if all of your paperwork is complete, you have the correct bills of sale, and you do it right, it is no more than an hour in DMV, and about the same at the CHP. A tip when going to the CHP, make sure all of the numbers that you have are visible and readable, BEFORE you go there. Otherwise, you may have to come back again, when you have removed the fender, cleaned the rust, or whatever else is going on where they can not read the numbers. And waiting another 6 to 12 weeks for an appointment is a pain.

What you will have titled (for example) is a "1924 Dodge Brothers 5 Window Coupe, 2008 New Construction". Make sure you put in the year and what you want it to be called, as what you submit on the paperwork will be the title of your documents for ownership.

If you have an original title for the car, you may not have to do any of this. However, it is important that you have all of the correct paperwork completed. Also that you are prepared to answer any questions by the DMV correctly. All you have to do is irritate a clerk, have a title for a 3 window, and an application for a 5 window, and you will not get an original title, but will have to jump through the hoops above, and have a title for a "new construction" car.

This is an easy and straightforward procedure if you get all your ducks in a row. Approach it with incomplete paperwork, bad choices of motor or illegible numbers, and you could be in for a nighmare. The above post suggests using AAA club for it, that is a good choice, and if you are unsure, you are far better having an agency do the legwork for you.

[edit] How to title and smog exempt a vehicle in CA

[edit] Definitions from California DMV webpage:

[edit] Specially constructed vehicle

580. A "specially constructed vehicle" is a vehicle which is built for private use, not for resale, and is not constructed by a licensed manufacturer or remanufacturer. A specially constructed vehicle may be built from:

(1) a kit;

(2) new or used, or a combination of new and used parts, or;

(3) a vehicle reported for dismantling, as required by Section 5500 or 11520, which, when reconstructed, does not resemble the original make of the vehicle dismantled. A specially constructed vehicle is not a vehicle which has been repaired or restored to its original design by replacing parts.

Amended Ch. 1286, Stats. 1983. Effective January 1, 1984.

[edit] What is the Specially constructed vehicles Emission Control Program?

Existing law requires most 1976 and newer model year vehicles to pass an emissions control inspection (smog check) prior to original registration, transfer of ownership, and every second annual renewal. Since Specially Constructed Vehicles (SPCNS) are homemade and do not have a manufacturer-assigned model year, they must be taken to a Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR) Referee Station for the original inspection. Upon completion of the inspection, the referee will affix a tamper-resistant label to the vehicle and issue a certificate that establishes the model-year for future inspection purposes.

Per California Vehicle Code §4750.1, the first 500 program applicants in each calendar year may choose whether the inspection is based on the model-year of the engine used in the vehicle or the vehicle model-year. If the engine or the vehicle does not sufficiently resemble one previously manufactured, the referee will assign 1960 as the model-year.

After the first 500 vehicles have been registered in any calendar year, all others will be assigned the same model-year as the calendar year in which the application is submitted.

Previously registered vehicles may be included as one of the first 500 applicants in a calendar year and apply for a different model-year determination. What is an SPCNS Certificate of Sequence?

An SPCNS Certificate of Sequence identifies a vehicle as one for which the owner may choose emission control inspection based on the model-year of the engine used in the vehicle or the vehicle model-year. The certificate is issued by DMV Headquarters and will be mailed 7-10 working days after the application is accepted by your local DMV. The certificate must be presented to the BAR Referee Station at the time of inspection.

Per statute, only 500 certificates can be issued in a calendar year. Once the yearly allotment has been issued, applicants must wait until the following year to apply for a certificate.

SPCNS Certificates of Sequence cannot be transferred to a different vehicle or reissued in someone else's name. The seller of a vehicle must provide the buyer with the SPCNS Certificate of Sequence along with the bill of sale and any additional registration documents. In addition, fees deposited in one year cannot be held over for the next year's allocation of certificates.

Note: Due to the limited number of SPCNS Certificates of Sequence available, you may wish to submit your application for registration in person at a local DMV office.

[edit] Example:

'27 T roadster body only. Plans call for a homemade frame, turbo 2.3L, T5, etc. Remember, T's had the original VIN on the engine block and it's long gone. The only things I walked into DMV with were a 'bill of sale' from the previous owner, the craigslist ad where I found it, a picture of the car in my backyard, and these forms:

  • Form 343..........Application for Title or Registration
  • Form 124..........Application for Assigned VIN plate
  • Form 5036........Statement of Construction
  • Form 256..........Statement of Facts

Make sure whoever helps you is knowledgeable in the Specially Constructed Vehicle registration process. First thing the clerk did was enter my T into the system. That's where forms 343 and 124 came in. Next, he called Sacramento to get the SB100 number. That is the holy grail! A number within the 500 allotted numbers. The local offices have one designated phone number to call to access the SB100 database. I paid $96 in fees and now have the choice of having my car smogged as a '27 or '88... guess which one I'm choosing!

I've been assigned a temporary VIN that's good for 3 years, or whenever I have the car safety certified by the CHP, whichever comes first. If I don't have it finished by the 3 year mark, I simply take the paperwork back to DMV and have it renewed.

Once it's running I need to have a CHP officer inspect it and sign off. Basically it needs to have lights, horn, seat belts, working brakes, turn signals and a few other things.

Next, I go to the BAR referee where I'll choose to have it smogged based on the year of body, 1927. 1927 is outside the jurisdiction of current smog laws! Oh well!

[edit] Colorado

[edit] Connecticut

Building your own hot rod or chopper? Remember, if you want to ever drive your custom-built vehicle, you're going to need to register it. Connecticut allows registration of custom-built/composite vehicles, but the vehicle must first pass a special inspection process.

[edit] Before you start building

If you've used parts from other vehicles to build your own, you need to make sure you have title certificates for each vehicle used for component parts, as well as receipts for all parts used. If any parts are from used vehicles, you need to include VIN numbers on each receipt.

To get a registration, you're going to have to submit your vehicle to a detailed inspection process, during which time you are required to show all receipts and titles. No receipts means no inspection and no registration.

[edit] Ready for inspection

When you're ready for the vehicle to be registered and inspected, you need to do the following:

  • Use the Department of Motor Vehicles telephone center to make an appointment for a composite vehicle inspection. Composite inspections are done at the Wethersfield office only by appointment.
  • Tranport the vehicle by flat-bed truck or trailer to the inspection station. You cannot drive or tow the vehicle. None of its wheels can touch the ground until it passes inspection and you are granted a registration.
  • Complete an application for composite inspection and bring it to the DMV inspection station, along with two photos of the vehicle and all supporting documents―including titles and receipts for all major parts. The inspection fee is $88 and the VIN costs another $50.
  • If your vehicle passes inspection the DMV inspector will assign a VIN to your vehicle, which will allow you to begin the standard process of applying for a registration and title. If you fail, you can ask for a re-inspection without going through the appointment process.

You're also going to have to submit your vehicle for an emissions exam. Some vehicles are exempt from emissions testing. Until January 2007, any composite vehicle that is not exempt must pass standard state emission testing. After new rules go into effect in January 2007, composite vehicles will have to meet specific standards.

[edit] Exempt vehicles

There are some exemptions to the program, particularly newer models, many older vehicles, motorcycles and other specialized vehicles:

  • New vehicles that are four or less model years old (as of 1/1/07 model years, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008).
  • A motor vehicle twenty five-years old or older, (as of 1/1/07, model years 1983 and older).
  • Vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds, such as certain heavy-duty trucks or recreational vehicles
  • Composite Vehicles ( Effective July 1, 2007)
  • Electric-powered vehicles
  • Bicycles with motors attached
  • Motorcycles
  • Certain vehicles registered but not designed primarily for highway use
  • Farm vehicles
  • Class-1 School Buses
  • Vehicles with Dealer, Repairer, or Transporter Plates while official tests are obtained

[edit] Delaware

[edit] Florida

Registering and titling your custom-built car doesn't have to be as complicated as the car construction itself. In fact, it's much like registering any other car, with just a few extra steps along the way.

These steps apply to vehicles constructed from body kits that are attached to existing car frames, new frames provided by manufacturers, or homemade frames. Submit all forms and documentation to your local county tax collector's office to register and title your custom car.

[edit] Application for kit mounted on a car frame previously titled in Florida

You'll need:

1. Florida title from original car frame, which must be in your name or at least with a completed application to transfer the title into your name. 2. The body kit MCO, assigned to you. A bill of sale is acceptable if the manufacturer didn't issue an MCO. 3. Completed Application for Certificate of Title. 4. Notarized affidavit, stating that the vehicle is able to be operated on public roads. The statement must also list the repairs made to the vehicle. 5. Bills of sale or receipts for all parts and equipment that weren't part of the original frame or the body kit. All documents must include name, address, and signature of seller. Components may include front end, rear end, doors, engine, transmission, frame, cowl assembly, and airbag, or any parts of those elements. 6. Applicable sales tax (or fill out the statement on sales tax on the application form). 7. Florida license plate number for the vehicle, or an affidavit of non-use. 8. Applicable title fees. (Use the License Plate Rate Chart to calculate all specific charges.

[edit] Application for kit mounted on a car frame previously titled in another state

You'll need:

  • Out-of-state title or proof of ownership from the original car frame, which must be in your name or at least with a completed application to transfer the ownership into your name.
  • All documentation listed in items 2 through 8, above.

[edit] Application for kit mounted on a homemade frame

You'll need:

  • Notarized affidavit detailing the frame's construction. (This can be submitted with the statement of repairs, as listed in item four, above.)
  • All documentation listed in items 2 through 8, above.

[edit] Application for kit mounted on a new frame provided by the manufacturer

You'll need:

  • Manufacturer's bill of sale or invoice proving that the frame was included with the body kit.
  • All documentation listed in items 2 through 8, above.

[edit] Title language

When you receive your title and registration, you'll notice a few things that will be noted differently than for your regular motor vehicle:

  • The year (YR) of the vehicle will be the year the car was built.
  • The make will be the make shown on the Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin (MCO) or the manufacturer's bill of sale.
  • The identification number will be the VIN given on the MCO or bill of sale.
  • The words "kit car" will be typed on the title and will carry that brand as long as the vehicle exists.
  • All kit cars are titled as used vehicles.

[edit] Resources

[edit] Georgia

In Georgia you can contact the DMV or go to their web page get a form then request that a DMV officer come out to your location and inspect the vehicle. At that time they will issue you a vin number and tag the car with that vin embossed on a metal tag. With that and the insurance go to the tag office. The form needed is T-22B I believe the cost is 50 beans

Custom cars built in Georgia that are less than 25 years old follow the same registration, title, and tag procedures as a regular passenger vehicle.

You will need a valid Georgia driver's license, proof of insurance, and the appropriate fees and taxes. Georgia charges an $18 title fee and a $20 registration fee. Tag costs and taxes will vary by county.

No title or certificate will be issued to any car unless it meets the emissions standards adopted by the state. Your vehicle will need to be inspected prior to being registered.

Hobby and antique vehicles over 25 years old (or vehicles manufactured to resemble such vehicles) are eligible for a special license plate through the state of Georgia. These cars do not require any special permits to operate on state roadways as long as they display a valid tag.

Questions about registering, titling, and tagging your custom-built, hobby, or antique car should be directed to your county tax commissioner. This office can also tell you the specific fees involved to register and title your vehicle.

Homemade trailers have their own registration process, and they receive special tags. Such trailers are not titled.

[edit] Registration periods

Georgia has three registration periods, depending on where you live. Most of the counties use an open, year-round registration system. This means you register and renew your registration in the 30 days prior to your birthday each year. Registration ends on your birthday at midnight.

A few counties (Calhoun, Charlton, Clay, McIntosh, Mitchell, Randolph, Stewart, and Turner) have a four-month registration period. In these counties you must renew your registration any time from January 1 to April 30.

Talbot County has the only staggered registration in the state. If your birthday falls in:

  • January, February, or March: Registration is January 1-31.
  • April, May, or June: Registration is February 1-28 (in a leap year, the last day of registration is February 29).
  • July, August, or September: Registration is March 1-31.
  • October, November, or December: Registration is April 1-30.

[edit] Hawaii

There are two street rod classifications. One is "STREET ROD" and the other is "STREET ROD REPLICA". The second is for non car company vehicles like Downs fiberglass replicas. To get a Hawaii title the vehicle must pass and obtain a "reconstruction sticker", referred to as RECON. To get the RECON sticker the vehicle must have things like sealed headlights, turn signals, safety glass windshield, emergency brake, seat belts, horn, brake lights, windshield wiper and an official vehicle weight reading that can obtained from the local truck weighing station. Take the vehicle and the weight paper to RECON where they will take a picture or two, look over the vehicle and send in the paper work to get the RECON sticker. In a few days they will have a RECON sticker and then get the vehicle inspected. Take the RECON papers, the inspection papers, weight paper and previous title (if there is one) to the city hall department of motor vehicles along with some cash to get the vehicle titled and registered.

[edit] Idaho

USRI (United Street Rods of Idaho) have a lot of info on their site. Idaho seems to be one of the better states to deal with. Street rods are titled as the year the body most closely resembles. You have to meet requirement for that year, Your fiberglass 31 roadster will meet requirements for a stock car of 1931. You need to keep receipts of all your parts and the inspector likes to see picture of your build. USRI recommends you get a meeting with your area inspector when you start so you will not have any problems later. Vehicles with no title need a bill of sale and an inspection by the DMV or sheriff or police to verify year. model, make vin or id number. They do a search of information of file then if clear issue you a new title. Most difficult to title would be a custom build car that has no resemblance to a production vehicle. Would have to meet new requirements. You can go to IDAHO DMV and print out the forms you will need, e.g. bill of sale, inspection form, application for title, etc.

[edit] Illinois

[edit] Indiana

[edit] No title, no VIN tag, and purchased vehicle out of state

Any documentation you can get of the vehicle is important, especially a Bill of Sale. You can use Indiana Bill of Sale State form 44237 @ www.in.gov/bmv/forms, or make your own stating as much information as possible about the vehicle, purchase price and the seller information. Both seller and buyer sign and date the form. A police officer will have to inspect the vehicle. Provide him with all the documentation you have and indicate you have no VIN tag. He will fill out a Physical Inspection of an Indiana Resident's Vehicle Form stating no VIN tag or Plate number/State.

[edit] With VIN

If you have a VIN number they will verify through a IDACS/NCIC check to make sure the vehicle isn't stolen. Once completed you take this form and your Bill of Sale and any other information about the vehicle with you to your Indiana BMV and apply for a new VIN number which will be mailed to you. Once you receive the new VIN number, have a legible tag made by a local trophy shop with the new number and affix it to the vehicle in or about the original location of the VIN tag. Once completed a Police officer again will have to come out and verify all documentation, new tag location and charge $5.00 for the Physical Inspection form he signs stating everything is in order. The last step in this process is to return to the BMV will all your documentation and apply for a Certificate of Title. At this point you will pay your sales tax from your Bill of Sale form and a fee for the Title Application. Once completed your new vehicle title will be mailed in 4-6 weeks.

[edit] Iowa

[edit] Titling scratch built or reconstructed rods and motorcycles in Iowa

Having just been through this process, here's the procedure, how it went for me,and a few tips.I built a trike,however this procedure is the same for street rods and motorcycles etc,that are built from scratch.

  1. Hopefully before you start your project, download the "Equipment Requirements" link above. This document lists the minimum items the inspector will be looking for when the time comes. Print out several copies, study it and know it like the back of your hand. Yes, it says your street rod has to have fenders, and in the state of Iowa it's supposed to, at least for the first inspection. Take them off later if you want.
  2. Save all receipts and document everything as you go. Do not use a major part in your project if you do not have documentation for it. What kind of documentation?? For the engine and trans for example, you must have some sort of document that shows where these pieces came from. If you have an engine in your garage that has been sitting there for years and you have no documentation for it you have a couple choices: Don't use it, get a buddy to forge a receipt for it. Or be able to show a title to a vehicle that you got the parts from. The trail doesn't have to be real long, just somebody they can contact to verify you purchased it from somebody and have rightful ownership of the item. Ideally, if you have an OEM frame, body or portion of either, you should have a title or receipt showing where you got the item. Again, the trail doesn't have to be long, just a trail. If you scratch build a frame, be able to show where the steel came from.
  3. Build away. Follow the rules, make it look decent, document it well, and you should fly through. Do something weird and you'd better expect to answer for it, depending on who the inspector is. Just do it right and you'll have no problems. If you have any questions, either consult with somebody who's been through the process before, or go straight to your local DMV investigator. The investigators are listed in the link above.
  4. Once you're done, or think you're done, contact your local DMV investigator and make an appointment for your inspection. BTW, the vehicle does not have to be completed to the point of being pained and show ready. It has to be assembled and road worthy, that's it. So if you want to get the documentation done/road tested and then tear it back down for paint etc that's your choice, it does not have to be fully complete for inspection.

Here's how it goes:

a. You will either have to transport your vehicle (no driving it) to the DMV office, or the investigator will come to you. My person acted like it could be done either way, and she came to me, but some have said they had to go to the office. Depends on the investigator I think. Let them know that you have the above list of requirements and believe that you've met all of them. Have a printout in hand when they show up, they'll ask for it.

b. The actual physical inspection. All investigators are different. Some will only give your project a cursory once-over, some will nit pick it all the way. Mine only looked to see that I had lights, horn, etc., didn't even ask to see that they worked. When she started down the list of requirements and I was able to show her each of the first three or four she pretty much gave up, she knew it was a waste to check each one. I think what it comes down to is if your vehicle looks like you knew what your doing, it's safely constructed, and you won't kill somebody else the first trip around the block, the inspector isn't gonna have a problem with it. Put together something questionable and you'll be in for a battle.

c. Review of documentation. Again, better to show them you're on the up and up than try to hide something. If you have a 2" thick pile of documentation your gonna be better off than if you have 2 Walmart receipts. Also, they will want copies of all receipts, it's probably in your best interest to have 2 copies ready for them. Mine took them back to the office for copying and delivered them back to me the next day. Having a set of copies will save them the trip, and get you registered one day sooner.

Also, your receipts will determine the taxable value of your vehicle, which determines the amount of Iowa road use tax that you will pay. You will be taxed at the state sales tax rate (5% as of 2007) on all parts you have not paid tax on. See hints below.

d. VIN assignment. Seems to be standard procedure that the inspector will bring the assigned VIN sticker with them and will attach it once the inspection is complete. They will also ask to stamp the new VIN somewhere in the frame. You will want a bare metal spot masked off for the stamping, or you will have to grind off a spot for it. It has to be stamped on bare steel. You can paint or clear coat the spot after.

e. Actual registration. Once your inspection is complete, your investigator will notify your county treasurer's office with the information from your vehicle. In my case she Emailed both me and the treasurer's office right from her car before leaving my house. They will include your vehicle description, assigned VIN and the amount you owe tax on. You go to the license plate office, fill out the application for title, pay your taxes and your done. Even though it took three people and a review of a couple procedure manuals, it was probably the shortest trip I've had there in a long time.

[edit] Some hints:

1. Again, remember to be on the up and up with this deal. You've probably got several thousand dollars wrapped up in this deal, not to mention many many hours of your blood sweat and tears, the last thing you want to happen is to have it all fall through at the last step. Be courteous.

Example: I built a V8 powered trike, inspired by one that I had seen done when I was in high school 25 years ago. The original builder got caught driving it on his father's dealer plate and the local investigator found out about it. Strike one. When he finally called to have it inspected, he had almost no documentation on any of the parts, including a fair amount of Harley parts, that he had used building it. Strike two. Besides all that, he pushed the requirements right to the limit: one taillight, one mirror, funky exhaust, marginal fenders, etc. Having started out on the wrong foot, this was the last straw. Strike three.

I know where this trike is. To this day it sits, never licensed, never legally ridden on the road. It's a shame, a beautiful project that got scuttled before it was officially launched...

2. Receipts and taxes. Probably the one sticky spot I ran into was that during the building of my project I bought about 80% of the parts off Ebay. Buying the actual parts was no problem at all, I had excellent luck and made some good deals, saved alot of money on parts that I needed. The problem was that the state of Iowa is gonna get its tax share no matter what, and I payed no verifiable tax on about $9000 worth of parts. Ouch, but what do you do?? The investigator can ask for a receipt or documentation for any part on the vehicle, you can't hold some back and not others because you don't know what they'll ask for. You obviously can't ask them to inspect a $30,000 vehicle and only hand over $1000 worth of receipts, questions WILL come up. If you buy something local, make sure you get a receipt, and make sure that there's a line on it that says "tax", if not you'll end up paying tax on it again.

So, you have two choices. Buy all your parts locally so you can show that the tax was paid up front, or simply turn over your receipts and pay the tax later. Maybe I was a fool, I turned in approx. $12000 worth of receipts and ended up paying tax on $9000 worth of it. I ended up paying a $450 one-time road use tax, but at this point I had a huge investment in time and materials, what's $450??

3. Do your research up front. You don't want to get all done and find out that your chopped coupe with a 4" windshield doesn't meet the requirements, the law says 6". You might sneak by, but then again you might not.

Hope this helps, if you have any questions please feel free to email me: tkrause "at" cedar-rapids.net

[edit] Kansas

In Kansas, you must follow the below instructions- which entails a massive amount of paperwork, receipts, inspections, etc.

If you have a Kansas titled vehicle, with the title in your name, you can usually just title it as a normal car/truck/motorcycle without a problem, even if it's been upgraded (Different engine, transmission etc.) In this case, there is NO inspection required. Quite naturally, I would suggest you keep any receipts to prove what you've done.

Any 'homebuilt' vehicle ( by YOUR definition to the Tag Office) will be assessed and taxed as a new car of the current year; It doesn't matter if you have a '49 Hudson built from salvaged parts, or a 2011 Cadillac frsh off the showroom floor, they will both cost the same to tag & title.

[edit] Kentucky

Kentucky permits the use of a year of manufacture plate, providing the owner of the vehicle purchases the required Kentucky historic plate and keeps the historic plate and the current year registration in the vehicle at all times. Vehicle must be 25 or more years old

[edit] Louisiana

[edit] Maine

Maine does not require titles for vehicles older than 15 years. Maine is also a non-resident registration state. Which means you can get your car registered there even if you have no address in the state. So for states requiring the last registered owners signature to obtain a title, you can give an agency in Maine power of attorney to register your vehicle there and then you become the last registered owner and can sign the forms in your own state to obtain a title. You have to have the car insured and provide a bill of sale and you'll pay taxes in Maine and your own state though.

[edit] Maryland

In Maryland, you can get a title with no problem if you can get the signature of the last registered owner for the vehicle. Barring that I do not know the process of obtaining a title with no previous owners signature for Maryland.

[edit] Titling a homemade, two-stage, or reconstructed vehicle

Explained below are the requirements for titling a “homemade” vehicle, a vehicle that was constructed by more than one manufacturer (i.e., two-stage),and a reconstructed vehicle. These vehicles are unusual in that they were built either by (or under the direction of) the vehicle’s owner or by more than one manufacturer. In most cases, the Maryland State Police must inspect the vehicle before it can be titled. Inspections are performed at the MVA’s Glen Burnie garage.

The requirements for titling the following vehicles are separately discussed below: Glider Kit Homemade trailer Kit car Kit trailer Two-stage vehicle Reconstructed vehicle Homemade motorcycle

[edit] Fees:

The fee for titling a vehicle typically includes a title fee, excise tax, and a security interest (lien) filing fee if required. The fee for registration varies by the type of vehicle, its weight, and/or its intended use. See Fees for Registration Plates for more information.

Contact Information:

MVA
Mail In Title Unit
6601 Ritchie Highway, NE
Glen Burnie, MD 21062

MVA
Glen Burnie Branch Office
6601 Ritchie Highway, NE
Glen Burnie, MD 21062

MVA Customer Service Center:
1-800-950-1MVA(1682)

[edit] How do I title a glider kit?

A glider kit consists of a truck frame, cab, front axle steering system and related accessories which are intended for assembly with an engine, transmission drive line, rear suspension, rear axle and related accessories from another vehicle. The completed vehicle has the outward appearance of a new truck.

You can apply for a title in person at the Glen Burnie branch office. Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

Proof of ownership – The ownership document must be for the vehicle frame used in building the glider kit: If the frame is new (kits usually have a new frame included), the certificate of origin included with the kit is required. If the frame is from a used vehicle, a title for the vehicle in your name or a title that has been properly assigned to you is required. If the frame is from a salvaged vehicle, a salvage certificate in your name or a certificate that has been properly assigned to you is required. Other documents that may establish ownership are: Registration document and bill of sale – ONLY if the state from which the frame was obtained did not issue a title (usually because of the vehicle’s age). Application – You may use either the back of the Maryland title, if applicable, or the Application for Certificate of Title to request the new title (and registration, if applicable). When the Maryland title is used as the application form, complete the section entitled Application for Title and Registration. Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor. Odometer disclosure statement - You may use the manufacturer's certificate of origin or the title to document the mileage of the vehicle. A separate odometer disclosure statement may also be submitted. Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number - A new vehicle identification number (VIN) will be assigned to the completed vehicle. The Maryland State Police will install the new VIN plate after they have inspected it.

[edit] How do I title a homemade trailer?

A "homemade" trailer is a trailer that is built by someone other than a licensed manufacturer.

You can apply for a title for a trailer that will carry 5,000 pounds or less in person at any of the MVA’s full service branch offices. You also can mail the documents to the MVA’s Mail In Title Unit in the Glen Burnie office, or go to an MVA licensed tag and title service where they will assist you in applying.

If the trailer will carry 5,001 pounds or more, you can apply for a title in person at the Glen Burnie branch office. In either case, you will need to submit the following documents:

Proof of ownership – The ownership document must be for the vehicle frame used in building the trailer (if any): If the frame is new, the certificate of origin included for the frame is required. If the frame is from a used vehicle, a title for the vehicle in your name or a title that has been properly assigned to you is required. If the frame is from a salvaged vehicle, a salvage certificate in your name or a certificate that has been properly assigned to you is required.

Other documents that may establish ownership are: Registration document and bill of sale – ONLY if the state from which the frame was obtained did not issue a title (usually because of the vehicle’s age); Sales receipts.

Application – You may use either the back of the Maryland title, if applicable, or the Application for Certificate of Title to request the new title (and registration, if applicable). When the Maryland title is used as the application form, complete the section entitled Application for Title and Registration.

Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor. Odometer disclosure statement - Not required for a trailer. Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number - A new vehicle identification number (VIN) will be assigned to the completed trailer. If the trailer is rated to carry more than 5,000 pounds, the Maryland State Police (MSP) also must inspect the completed trailer, at which time they will install the VIN plate. For lighter weight trailers (5,000 pounds or less), an MSP inspection is not required. However, in both cases you must submit a Maryland inspection certificate when registering the vehicle.

Certified Statement of Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) - The statement, signed by you, must declare the maximum weight to be carried by the trailer. Photographs of the trailer - Both side and rear view photographs of the trailer are required. The photos must show the full length of the trailer and include the trailer’s tongue (opposite angles), safety chains, license plate bracket, and taillights. Note that the wheels must be covered with fenders or the body of the trailer.

[edit] How do I title a kit car?

A kit car consists of a body, steering system, frame, and related accessories intended for assembly with an excess or salvage engine, transmission drive line, rear suspension, rear axle and related accessories. A kit car has the outward appearance of a Historic or Street Rod vehicle (though it is not titled as such).

You can apply for a title in person at the Glen Burnie branch office. Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

Proof of ownership – The ownership document must be for the vehicle frame used in building the kit car: If the frame is new (kits usually have a new frame included), the certificate of origin included with the kit is required. If the frame is from a used vehicle, a title for the vehicle in your name or a title that has been properly assigned to you is required. If the frame is from a salvaged vehicle, a salvage certificate in your name or a certificate that has been properly assigned to you is required.

Other documents that may establish ownership are: Registration document and bill of sale – ONLY if the state from which the frame was obtained did not issue a title (usually because of the vehicle’s age).

Sales receipts application – You may use either the back of the Maryland title, if applicable, or the Application for Certificate of Title to request the new title (and registration, if applicable). When the Maryland title is used as the application form, complete the section entitled Application for Title and Registration.

Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor. Odometer disclosure statement - You may use the manufacturer’s certificate of origin or the title to document the mileage of the vehicle. A separate odometer disclosure statement may also be submitted. Usually the mileage is “0” unless the frame was taken from a used/salvaged vehicle

Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number (if applicable): A new vehicle identification number (VIN) may be assigned to the completed vehicle. The Maryland State Police will install the new VIN plate after they have inspected it.

[edit] How do I title a kit trailer?

A kit trailer is a trailer that is assembled from a kit by someone other than a licensed manufacturer.

You can apply for a title at any MVA full service branch office. You also can mail the documents to the MVA’s Mail In Title Unit in the Glen Burnie office, or go to an MVA licensed tag and title service where they will assist you in applying. Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

Proof of ownership – Since the frame is new, the certificate of origin included with the kit is required.

Application – The Application for Certificate of Title must be submitted to request the new title (and registration, if applicable).

Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor. Odometer disclosure statement - Not required for a trailer.

Maryland safety inspection certificate - A safety inspection is required if the vehicle is being registered at the same time and the kit was assembled by someone other than an authorized trailer dealer (most cases).

[edit] How do I title a two-stage vehicle?

A two-stage vehicle is a vehicle that has been built by two separate manufacturers. The result is a standard, complete vehicle capable of performing its intended function. You can apply for a title at any of the MVA’s full service branch offices. You also can mail the documents to the MVA’s Mail In Title Unit in the Glen Burnie office (address above), or go to an MVA licensed tag and title service where they will assist you in applying.

Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

  • Proof of ownership – The certificates of origin from both the first and second stage manufacturers are required.
  • Application – The Application for Certificate of Title must be submitted to request the new title (and registration, if applicable).
  • Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor.
  • Odometer disclosure statement - The odometer reading will be certified on the certificate of origin or you may submit a separate odometer disclosure statement.
  • Contract from a board of education - This is needed for titling a school bus only. It certifies that your vehicle has been approved for use as a school bus.

[edit] How do I title a reconstructed vehicle?

A reconstructed vehicle is a vehicle that is created by the unique alteration of a standard vehicle, by someone other than the manufacturer.

You can apply for a title in person at the Glen Burnie branch office. Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

  • Proof of ownership – The ownership document must be for the vehicle frame used in building the reconstructed vehicle:
    • If the frame is new, the certificate of origin included with the kit is required.
    • If the frame is from a used vehicle, a title for the vehicle in your name or a title that has been properly assigned to you is required.
    • If the frame is from a salvaged vehicle, a salvage certificate in your name or a certificate that has been properly assigned to you is required.
  • Other documents that may establish ownership are:
    • Registration document and bill of sale – ONLY if the state from which the frame was obtained did not issue a title (usually because of the vehicle’s age).

Application:

  • You may use either the back of the Maryland title (if applicable), or the Application for Certificate of Title to request the new title (and registration, if applicable). When the Maryland title is used as the application form, complete the section entitled Application for Title and Registration.
  • Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor.
  • Odometer disclosure statement - You may use the manufacturer’s certificate of origin or the title to document the mileage of the vehicle. A separate odometer disclosure statement may also be submitted.
  • Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number (if applicable): A new vehicle identification number (VIN) may be assigned to the completed vehicle. The Maryland State Police will install the new VIN plate after they have inspected it.

[edit] How do I title a homemade motorcycle?

A “homemade” motorcycle is a motorcycle that is assembled from new and/or used parts by someone other than a licensed manufacturer.

You can apply for a title in person at the Glen Burnie branch office. Typically, you will need to submit the following documents:

  • Proof of ownership – Proof of ownership is required for the frame, engine and transmission used in building the motorcycle:
    • If the frame, engine and/or transmission is new, the manufacturer's certificate of origin is required.
    • If the frame is from a used vehicle, a title for the vehicle in your name or a title that has been properly assigned to you is required.
    • If the frame is from a salvaged vehicle, a salvage certificate in your name or a certificate that has been properly assigned to you is required.
  • Other documents that may establish ownership are:
    • Registration document and bill of sale – ONLY if the state from which the frame was obtained did not issue a title (usually because of the vehicle’s age).

Application – You may use either the back of the Maryland title or the Application for Certificate of Title to request the new title (and registration, if applicable). When the Maryland title is used as the application form, complete the section entitled Application for Title and Registration.

Proof of purchase price – You must submit the bills of sale and/or receipts for all parts and labor. The MVA may require that your proof of purchase documents be notarized.

Odometer disclosure statement - You may use the manufacturer’s certificate of origin or the title to document the mileage of the vehicle. A separate odometer disclosure statement may also be submitted.

Application for Assigned Vehicle Identification Number (if applicable) - A new vehicle identification number (VIN) may be assigned to the completed motorcycle. The Maryland State Police will install the new VIN plate after they have inspected it.

Motorcycle Equipment Certification - You must certify that the motor has a rating of more than 1.5 brake horsepower and a motor capacity of at least 49cc.

For all titling a Maryland safety inspection certificate - A safety inspection is required if the vehicle is being registered at the same time (most cases). Your title will be mailed to you. If you also register the vehicle (most cases), your registration card, license plates and expiration date stickers can be provided immediately when you apply in person to the MVA; otherwise, these items also will be mailed to you.

[edit] Massachusetts

Went to the RMV to inquire about registering my old car I have had for forty years. This is what they gave me at the Yarmouth RMV:

[edit] Purchasing an undocumented vehicle

A customer has purchased an old vehicle for which there is no title, proof of ownership, or any other record. It was purchased from a farmer who had the vehicle for the past twenty years and never bother to title or register it, The buyer wants to title and register this vehicle.

[edit] Solution:

The SELLER must provide the BUYER with a signed, notarized bill of sale stating the YEAR, MAKE, MODEL, VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (VIN),SELLING PRICE, AND ODOMETER READING, along with an account of how when and from whom the vehicle was acquired, and the circumstances of where, and to what use the vehicle has been placed during the seller's ownership.

In addition, either the seller or the Buyer will need to have a "Visual Inspection" (TV-7) completed by a law enforcement agency. At the same time, they must obtain a "Stolen Vehicle Inquiry Report" from that agency.

The Buyer must then forward the seller's notarized bill of sale as described above, along with the TV-7, the Stolen Vehicle Inquiry Report from a law enforcement agency, and a completed RMV-1 plus the $50.00 title fee, to Auto Theft. Auto Theft will evaluate the information presented, run a check on the vehicle, and if satisfactory, will direct that a Title be issued and sent to the BUYER. Once the title has been received, the BUYER may then register the vehicle.

I am having trouble getting the "Stolen Vehicle Inquiry Report" Since the car is not stolen the cops don't see a need. They told me to do a carfax, but I don't think the RMV will accept that.

Also, If the car is a gift from any member of your immediate family ,you do not have to pay sales tax. And, if you live at the same address or have the same last name the givor does not have to sign.

OK, I did the TV 7 and got the town police to come by and look at the car and sign off on the VIN. We had to use a magnifying glass as the original was really worn.. I would make sure your VIN is a good one or find out how to get one. If you don;t have one you can probably use the engine #.

I managed to get a stolen vehicle report run on this car to make sure it was not stolen and got the copy. Had to have this done at the police station. They really needed convincing as they thought why don't the RMV do it .

I then wrote a statement in short clipped sentences stating the whereabouts of the car. Where it had been garaged and what purpose it was being put to during that time.

In my case it was my dads. was in his garage and we worked on it from time to time until he gave it to me.

Therefore no sales tax. I had this statement notarized. I had the RMV-1 notarized. I had the TV7 signed off. I also did a form for antique plates.

Patty at the RMV was really nice and I had been there several times getting all this set up.

Once everything was proper and I got my tags on the spot. I was waiting for a revoke in the mail but instead got my title.

[edit] Michigan

Michigan has a process for titling an owner built vehicle, which is what many hot rods are. You are required to have receipts from major components of the vehicle (body, frame, engine, etc.) and get the application from the Secretary of State office. The vehicle will be inspected by an officer of the law (you can pick which police agency you go to) and must comply with a standard set of rules such as lights, turn signals, etc. Emission certification is not required. However, many choose to go with an original title for the modified car. This is much simpler as no inspection is required. Historic license plates are available from the state with 10 year renewal cycle.

If the vehicle has been unregistered for several years, there will be no record of the vehicle in the state's computer files. Just go to the Secretary of State office and request a new title to replace the title you "lost". Your age and the age of the vehicle must balance with the length of time the title has been "lost". Just be sure the vehicle is not listed as stolen in another state.

If you are restoring or rodding a vehicle with an intact VIN tag or stamping (on those without tags) and are missing the title, then you can get a form for a new title from the Secretary of State office. Fill out the form and have a police officer verify the tag and sign the form. Bring the form back to the SOS and the state will send a new title.

[edit] Minnesota

I just titled and licensed a early 70 motorcycle, but the procedure is the same for a car ( or so says the DMV ). It used to be a dirt bike but I put lights on it to make it street legal. the title process was simple. No inspection bonding, nothing. Just take two pictures of it from the side, fill out a couple of forms and they handed me a license plate! After of course I paid them $62 in fees.

The forms are basic and just ask the standard stuff like VIN numbers, receipts for major components etc. I had to sign an affidavit stating it wasn't stolen or anything. You only need a bond if you are titling a high value vehicle

[edit] Mississippi

[edit] Missouri

The state of Missouri remains committed to the idea that a vehicle with a lost title can never have one again, at least not by the state of Missouri. It doesn't matter if the vehicle has all the VIN and cowl tags in place; if they have no record of it, it doesn't exist. They will allow a "551 inspection" done by select Highway Patrol officers, but only if the vehicle is 'finished', IE, runs and drives and passes inspection and looks like new inside and out. There is no meaningful legal way to own or title it before then. If the vehicle is built from parts, even if the shell you start with has tags on it, they want copious amounts of documentation on the origins of virtually every nut and bolt, if it didn't come from that car to start with.

The state of Missouri has updated their website to include new information about titling classic vehicles. The procedure goes like this: seek out your local county circuit court and file for a "Declaratory Judgement" telling the judge your story and why the car belongs to you. If he/she decides in your favor and issues the judgment, send this form and a standard title application to the state and they will issue title.

Note- You may not be able to get an appointment to "see" the judge. You may have to hire an attorney and present a case and go through the whole legal (read bureaucratic) system.

[edit] Montana

[edit] Titling a vehicle with no VIN number or title (homemade hot rod)

This example is based on my experience trying to title a vehicle that comprised of an old body with no VIN numbers on it, mounted to a custom-made frame with no VIN numbers on it. This article is a stub, as I am in the middle of the procedure. As harrowing as dealing with the DMV can be, try to be patient - this particular request is not common in the State of Montana, as I have found out.

Remember, this particular example is used for vehicles that have NO VIN AND NO TITLE.

[edit] Step one

First, familiarize yourself with the Montana Vehicle Title and Registration Website, as you may need to refer to it from time to time when speaking with representatives at the DMV. Also be prepared to make photocopies of all of your documents that you mail in as a precaution.

Download form MV20 (Vehicle/Vessel/OHV Identification Number Inspection Certificate) in .pdf format and fill out in the appropriate areas. You will then call your local Police or Sheriff's Department, and state that you need to have a vehicle inspected. They will dispatch an officer to your location.

When the officer arrives, provide them with any paperwork you have or statements regarding the ownership of the vehicle. Basically, the officer is there to ensure that the vehicle you intend to title is indeed the same vehicle he is observing. Because your vehicle has no VIN, the officer should leave the VIN areas blank, but make a notation that the vehicle has no identifying numbers or markings on the frame or body.

[edit] Step two

Now that you have an inspection certificate filled out by the proper authorities, you must determine what your car's value is:

If the value is over $500, you must secure a bond equal to the value determined by the surety company. A simple phone call to your car insurance agent, asking him how to obtain a "Surety Bond" for your car. This is another interesting twist to the process, as you will be required to give a VIN number to obtain a Surety Bond. Tell your agent that you have no identifying marks on the vehicle and that the procedure to obtain a VIN requires a Surety Bond be issued before processing the paperwork. You will get a paper bond issued within a few days. Surety Bonds are usually required to be paid up-front and will last 3 years.

If the vehicle is worth $500 or less, you simply certify to its value. You must either: reference the average trade-in or wholesale value determined by the national appraisal guide as of January 1 for the year in which you are applying, or if an appraisal guide is not available, certify that, to your knowledge, its value is $500 or less. Be honest, because you'd hate to have your paperwork all jammed up because you tried to fudge your value.

[edit] Step three

Download form MV10 Affidavit/Application for Title With Insufficient Evidence of Ownership or Bonded Certificate of Title and MV10b Application for State Assigned Identification Numbers in .pdf format and fill out in the appropriate areas.

Why both forms? The MV10 is the application for the title of your vehicle that has no ownership evidence. MV10b is the application for the actual VIN number. You'll need to fill them out both. Don't forget your $5 payment included with form MV10b.

Once you've filled out the above two forms, gather them up along with your inspection certificate (Form MV20) and your Surety Bond (if you need one) - and make photocopies of everything. Put all the originals in an envelope to the Title and Registration Bureau address on the forms, and mail it away.

[edit] Step four

In about one to two weeks, you will receive a VIN number foil sticker in the mail. Do not apply this sticker yourself. Follow the instructions in the enclosed envelope to bring your vehicle to the nearest Driver's License Inspection Station in your area. I highly suggest calling to confirm the location of where you need to bring your vehicle. Be sure to speak with the inspector and familiarize him with your vehicle. Making an appointment wouldn't hurt either. If everyone is on the same page with what you are trying to do with your vehicle, the easier it will be to achieve your goal.

[edit] Step five

I met with the Vehicle Inspector at the Driver's License Inspection Station, and he installed the VIN sticker on the vehicle, signed the paperwork and returned it to me. This may not always be the case, as the wording on the form does not specify who sends the paperwork in once the sticker is applied. I then promptly sent the paperwork back to the address on the form.

[edit] Step six

A few weeks later I received a letter from the Title and Registration bureau. It was too thick to be my title, so I prepared for another volley of correspondence. The letter inside asked that the Surety Bond I obtained from my insurance agent be updated to reflect my new Montana VIN number I had been given for the car. It also requested a $10 fee for a Bonded Certificate of Title - which is a little different than a normal title. The Title and Registration Bureau will issue a title with the words "BONDED TITLE" and the expiration date of the bond printed on its face.

If no claim is made on the vehicle within three years, the bureau then issues a clear title, and you won't have to renew your Surety Bond (which is good for 3 years).

The updated Surety Bond took about a week to get re-issued, and when it arrived I wrote a $10 check, made a copy of the letter to include, Surety Bond and returned the contents as per the instructions. My title showed up approximately two weeks later.

[edit] Step seven

I am now ready to license my vehicle. You have two options, one: take your title to your local courthouse and register it and get regular license plates. This is the quickest route to go, but if you really want to take advantage of your old vehicle's status, choose the next option. Download form (Application for Registration of a Vintage or Pioneer Vehicle) and register your vehicle as a Vintage or Pioneer vehicle. The registration is permanent, and depending on your car could be as little as $10 for the lifetime of your ownership. Using this form will require to send your information to the State DMV office, and may take several weeks - but if you have the time, I would highly suggest it. Be sure to read the limitations on form MV3 to make sure your vehicle's use falls within the State's requirements. Send in the proper amount, and a short while later, you'll get your plates.

[edit] Nebraska

[edit] Nevada

Registering your custom-built car is a fairly simple process―probably much simpler than the vehicle construction itself. It's much like registering any other motor vehicle, except for one additional form and a required inspection.

The Certificate of Inspection/Affidavit of Vehicle Construction is vital. (This can be found at http://www.dmvnv.com/pdfforms/rd64.pdf) On this form, a representative of a state-registered garage or body shop must complete the first part, as well as sections A, B, or C, as applicable.

The garage representative will inspect the vehicle and give various parts of your car a "pass" or "fail" related to safety and state requirements. Once all parts receive a pass, he or she will then sign off on the vehicle, stating that it's safe to operate on Nevada roads. Now you can proceed with the registration.

You will then need to fill out Part II of the form, but hold off on signing that section until you're in the presence of a DMV official, who will witness your signature and complete the last part of the form.

This means that you'll need to apply for registration in person, at your nearest full-service DMV office. At the time of application, you'll also have to show all other ownership documents, as required for any other motor vehicle registration.

[edit] New Hampshire

New Hampshire does not require titles on vehicles twenty years or more old. However registering a hot rod with a standard auto registration will not allow you to run without fenders, bumpers, no hood, etc. A simple bill of sale written on a scrap of paper is good enough in New Hampshire to register a car. However New Hampshire has a Street Rod plate that allows for these modifications. Criteria is pre-1948 similar to what NSRA uses for screening vehicles. You must have a body, original or replica, that resembles a pre-1948 vehicle. Each vehicle is inspected, prior to registration, by NHDOT inspector. The criteria in the law is the same as the NSRA safety inspection criteria. You need wipers, lights, safety glass and most important, they will inspect for scrub line. This means the vehicle has to roll easily with all four tires flat, no piece of frame or suspension can hit the ground when tires go flat. When building a street rod, most guys will put four steel rims only on the car and make sure it rolls. The DOT inspector will issue a VIN and affix it to the vehicle if you successfully pass the vehicle inspection. You make an appointment and the NHDOT inspector will come to your shop or garage and do the inspection. You are issued one plate for rear of the car and street rod plates have an inspection date of April of each year, regardless of owner birthday, so that it provides for the fact most street rods are stored in New Hampshire's long winter. Go to http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XXI/261/261-89-b.htm for official law.

[edit] New Jersey

Call the title department of the NJ MVS.

[edit] Historic and Hot Rod plates..

GoTo www.state.nj.us/mvc.. select Top Button= 'Vehicles'.. select Side Button= 'License Plates'.. scroll down to select= 'Specialty Plates'.. scroll down to select= 'Special Vehicles'..

[edit] Other title information

goto www.state.nj.us/mvc.. select Top Button= 'Vehicles'.. scroll down under 'Titles'.. select= '"Special Vehicle" Titles'..

The above was researched by Chester Breder and is the only way to find this information on the NJ web site. I'm not sure about the following information.

Any car significantly modified beyond original must be titled as a new car. There a special rules to make titling easy for custom vehicles and you must get a safety inspection.

A significantly modified vehicle must be titled with a new title in the year it was finished. The car can not be titled with what matches the original body. So a 1931 model A coupe with a 61 Chevy engine, a mustang II front end and a Jag rear can not be titled as a 1931 Model A. It is no longer the original car, it is a new one off car. A car that is not legally titled is also not legally registered. A car that is not legally registered and not legally titled is not insurable. The insurance company may decide they do not want to pay for your accident and use the fact the car is not legal as the reason to not pay.

Sorry I can not report more, I was inquiring about getting a legal title for a historic vehicle and got sidetracked.

Feel free to call the NJ MVS title division to confirm the above facts.

I called the NJMVS and requested their titling/registration package for what they describe as a "specialty vehicle". A lot of red tape, but bottom line is that you need to document entire build with corresponding costs...They want to see how much you paid for everything so that they can charge sales tax, just like if you purchased a new vehicle off of the lot. If you have sales receipts for parts that the tax was already paid, that I guess would be exempt. As I get further into this, I'll post update or revise as necessary.

Update by steve392 on 10/3/07...Got further into it with NJMVS. A specialty (or reconstructed) vehicle will be titled in the year in which it is completed. So instead of having a '41 Willys, '32 Ford, etc., if you title it this year, it will officially be a 2007. The make will be "REC" (for reconstructed) and the model will be "Custom".

[edit] New Mexico

We have a couple ways of registering vehicles without titles.

If the vehicle has a VIN number you must run a 50 state VIN check to verify if the vehicle is on the stolen list. We do this by sending the "VIN check form" to our main MVD office in Santa Fe. If it comes back clean we must obtain a "BOND" that usually costs 50 bones through a private insurance company that deals in bond insurance. The bond is in case an owner comes along down the road and claims the vehicle as theirs. The bond shuts them up. Show the MVD all your bills of sale for the vehicle, the 50 state check and the bond and they issue you a clean title. If you start with a "hybrid hot rod" where the body is different than the frame, NM goes by what the frame is to determine the vehicle make and model. If the frame has a VIN number stamped in it, which most do in "secret places" only the State VIN inspectors know the locations. If they find the VIN, they will title the vehicle by the frame number no matter what the body is! You can put any body on any frame but the frame rules.

The "hard way" is a "home made vehicle" title. This is required if you build a vehicle from scratch that doesn't have any VIN information. Glass vehicles and "bare body builds" without VIN tags must go this route. If you build the frame from scratch you must go the home made vehicle route. This is a bitch as the vehicle must meet all the standard safety features required of all vehicles like functional lights, turn signals, rear view mirrors, horn, Dual master cylinders and two means of stopping the vehicle, i.e. functional emergency brake, windows, etc. You must also get the vehicle weighed at a certified scale. The vehicle will be titled as a current year vehicle as it was titled. In other words if you build a 1930 hot rod it will be titled a 2012, or current year vehicle. Being a new vehicle it must also have ALL the emissions gear required for the year of the engine if it's 1975 or newer! CATS, O2 sensors, canister, etc, etc. If the engine is 1974 or older, it doesn't require emissions testing and all you have to do is take it to the Emissions HQ in Albuquerque and obtain an emissions exemption certificate.

You can also go to a "Title specialist" licensed with the state to get the title for you, for a price. It involves them advertising the vehicle with a lien for a certain amount of time. If nobody claims it you get a title for it. This route is the most expensive but you don't have to do any legwork.

[edit] New York

Titling here is fairly simple, as there are no titles for motor vehicles 1972, and prior. The rules are less strict than other states, but the basics of basics. If you have a reproduction body, and it came with an MSO (Manufacturers Statement of Origin), you can stamp the MSO vin onto the frame. If the frame is a reproduction or fabricated from scratch this is possible. However, stamping this number on an existing frame is a criminal offense in every state. Then get a trace of the new vin, take it to the motor vehicle's with a couple of forms that they can give you, have somebody else fill them out, and sign them, and fill the bill of sale out as though they sold the vehicle to you. Of course, this is a felony since he didn't own it, and didn't sell it to you.

After all is said, and done you will get a 30 day non transferable registration which after 30 days turns into a transferable. There is no police verification necessary. There are more correct ways of titling as a home built vehicle, but this way is quicker. The same process goes for 1972, and prior motor vehicles that have a lost registration, only use the vehicles vin number.

[edit] North Carolina

If you have a VIN, but no title, you can get a Surety Bond from some insurance agencies and then apply for a title. This states that if there is no challenge to that title for a year, it is yours. This is used for abandoned vehicles. A surety bond requires the vehicle be running, a couple of inspections and/or appraisals, and a deposit of 150% the value of the vehicle (based on a DMV schedule) in addition to their customary title and registration fees.

There is also a form for lost titles, that can be signed and submitted, but if the title has not been active for ten years or so, you have to call NCDMV in Raleigh and have them manually put the VIN back into the computer.

There is also a form for hand made vehicles that will require you to show receipts for every component, and keep a log showing your work. This will allow you to apply for a new title. I have not done that.

They don't seem to be very strict about modifications, and titles and licenses are handled by private subcontractors, who have no incentive to obstruct you. If you change the number of doors or something, you will have to modify the title. I don't know the procedure on that. There is no space for color, for example, and even school buses and campers are registered and insured as trucks. Real RV's may be different.

[edit] Update

I did go down an talked to the State Police June 08, with an out of state bill of sale. They want to see the actual vehicle, which means trailering it down to them. They will inspect it, assign a VIN Number and allow you to seek a Surety Bond, if you can find an insurance company to do that.

Here is the link to NC DOT: http://www.ncdot.org/dmv/vehicle_services/registrationtitling/howToRegister.html

This the link to a 10Mb pdf file with the NC Vehicle Regulations: http://www.ncdot.org/dmv/vehicle_services/registrationtitling/titlemanual/

This is an excerpt from it:

SECTION 1 Chapter 7; Page 6 SPECIAL TITLES Requirements For Titling Custom-Built Vehicles

CUSTOM-BUILT MOTOR VEHICLES G.S. 20-39, 53 A custom built vehicle is completely reconstructed or assembled from new or used parts. The vehicle will be registered showing the make as Custom-Built, and the year the vehicle was built will be the designated year model. The North Carolina title will be branded “Reconstructed.”

1. Application for title, Form MVR-1, completed in full and signed before a notary. 2. Affidavit for Custom Built Vehicle, Form MVR-55 (notarized statement explaining how the vehicle was assembled from new and used parts.) 3. Inspector’s report 4. Odometer reading is required 5. Furnish certificate of title or MCO for the frame, engine and transmission as proof of ownership or file an indemnity bond. 6. Title fee of $40.00 7. 3% highway use tax based on the total bills of sale for the entire purchase of new and used parts and labor.

NOTE: Please be sure to read this link below. If it gets passed into a law that will change how all vehicles in NC are registered. There is another amendment to this one that I can not find right now. These will affect how the cars are registered and insured since most insurance companies will not recognize the term "Custom Vehicle".

NC vehicle registration info

[edit] North Dakota

You will need a notarized bill of sale. proof that a search was done showing that the vehicle is not currently registered. A vehicle inspection needs to be completed by the ND Highway Patrol. The officer who inspected the vehicle will give you a copy that includes all serial numbers and vin number. (All at no cost) Take the certificate and your notarized bill of sale to the Motor Vehicle branch office and apply for a new title and pay the sales tax due. You will then receive a title. But cannot license it until a final inspection is done. A final inspection is done when the vehicle is road ready and must have all the necessary equipment in working order. Such as lights, wipers, horn,seat belts, turn signals etc. Once the final inspection is completed you can then purchase license plates and tabs.

[edit] Ohio

Here is the official info from the Ohio State Patrol's website for salvage or self assembled vehicles.

Salvage inspection

By the way, the patrol officer at the Seville post who handles inspections seems quite knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the hobby. Although there is an inspection of the completed car, they seem to concentrate more on the paperwork and documentation ensuring that parts are from a documented source. And don't be even a minute late for your inspection.

I have been told by the OSP via phone conversations the car is required to have fenders, windshield wipers with washers, seat belts, tail lights, headlights, turn signals, horn, and mufflers. The OSP officer states that fenders are many times removed by owners after inspection without comment from the OSP.

To title a vehicle with no title you can go to the DMV and they will do a title search. If nothing comes up then there is a packet they will give you to complete. This includes a further national search to determine if the vehicle has been stolen. You then plead your case before a judge and he makes a determination. You take his judgment back to the DMV and they issue you a title for you vehicle in your name. This is a model year title that is the same as if you had an original that was transferred to you. I got a title for a '48 International this way. Total cost was about $40 (in 2008). I never even saw the judge, his assistant took my information to him and brought it back signed. I had a bill of sale from who I got the truck from and pictures of the truck to show the current condition(needing restoration).

[edit] Ohio year of manufacture plates (as of Jan, 2009)

General information

Purpose is to allow owners of historical vehicles to use Ohio plates for the same year as their vehicle was manufactured. (For More Information). (B) To qualify, motor vehicles must be at least 25 years old. They are solely collector's items and are used for participation in club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades, etc. They are NOT for general transportation.

Registrant eligibility

These plates may be issued to any Ohio motorist. (B)These plates may be issued to any Ohio motorist. The vehicle must be 25 years of age or older. It is a collector's vehicle used in participation in club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades, but NOT for general transportation.

Title requirements

Ohio Certificate of Title issued in individual's name, either singly or jointly, or the name is the same name on the lease agreement.

Vehicle Information

These plates may be used on any vehicle.

Type of Plates

egistrant provides his/her own plates which must be serviceable and legible and issued by Ohio and inscribed with the same year when the vehicle was manufactured.(B)Stock, reserved, or personalized plates inscribed with the words Historical Vehicle Ohio (personalized plates may now contain up to six characters). Model Year Plates are also permitted.

Issuance Information

Applicant must complete BMV Form 4806 (Affidavit For Registration) and BMV Form 4853 (Historical "Model-Year" Plate Information) and submit a copy of the model year plate(s).

Cost

The fee is determined by Ohio Revised Code section 4503.181. (B)There is a one-time fee of $10.00.

1908 Cobalt Blue White Porcelain enamel on Steel

1909 Cobalt Blue White Porcelain enamel on Steel

1910 Red Brown/Wood grain White Porcelain enamel on Steel

1911 White Black Porcelain enamel on Steel

1912 White-Ivory Green Steel, Flat Begin painted plates

1913 White-Ivory Maroon Steel, Flat

1914 White-Ivory Red Steel, Flat

1915 White-Ivory Black Steel, Flat

1916 Black White-Ivory Steel, Flat

1917 Yellow Black Steel, Flat

1918 Dark Olive Green White-Light Blue Steel Embossed plates begin. First year for painted border

1919 Maroon White Steel No painted border 1919-1934

1920 Dark Blue White Steel

1921 Green White Steel

1922 Light Gray Blue Steel

1923 Gray Red Steel

1924 Dark Blue-Black White Steel

1925 Ivory Black Steel

1926 Brown White Steel

1927 Gray Black Steel

1928 Dark Blue-Black White Steel

1929 Light Green Black Steel

1930 Maroon White Steel

1931 Gray Black Steel

1932 Dark Blue-Black White Steel

1933 Orange Black Steel

1934 Maroon White Steel

1935 Dark Blue-Black Yellow Steel Dies Changed. Painted border begins

1936 White Blue Steel

1937 White Maroon Steel

1938 White Black Steel 150th Anniversary of Northwest Territory, with covered wagon

1939 White Blue Steel

1940 Dark Blue-Black White Steel

1941 Maroon White Steel

1942 White Dark Green Steel

1943 1942 plates and Red windshield decal

1944 Dark Blue-Black White Steel One plate issued

1945 White Dark Blue-Black Steel One plate issued

1946 White Red Steel One plate issued

1947 Dark Green White Steel

1948 Light Yellow Black Steel and Aluminum

1949 Black Yellow Steel and Aluminum

1950 Yellow Black Steel and Aluminum

1951 Dark Blue White Steel

1952 1951 plates and Blue windshield decal

1953 Dark Green Yellow Steel One plate issued. 1803-1953 150 years of Ohio Statehood.

1954 Maroon White Steel

1955 Dark Blue White Steel

1956 Dark Green White Steel Standardized 6"x12" size

1957 Maroon White Steel

1958 Dark Blue White Steel

1959 White Red Steel

1960 Yellow Blue Steel

1961 Green White Steel

1962 Maroon White Steel

1963 Dark Blue White Steel

1964 Dark Green White Steel

1965 White Red Steel

1966 Red White Steel Multiple dies used,see below

1967 Medium Blue White Steel Multiple dies used,see below

1968 White Red Steel Multiple dies used,see below

1969 White Blue Steel Multiple dies used,see below

1970 Gray Red Steel Ohio State Univ.colors

1971 Yellow Black Steel Univ.of Toledo colors

1972 Blue Yellow Steel Kent State Univ. colors

1973 Green White Steel "Seat Belts Fastened?"

1974 White Green Steel and Aluminum Plate reflectorization begins. Ohio and Illinois dies used. "Seat Belts Fastened?"

1975 1974 Plates and Validation Sticker

1976 White Red Aluminum Begin no embossed date. No slogan on plates

1977 White Red Aluminum Validation stickers used

1978 White Red Aluminum

1979 White Red Aluminum

1980 White Blue Aluminum

1981 White Blue Aluminum

1982 White Blue Steel

1983 White Blue Steel

1984 White Blue Steel

[edit] Oklahoma

In Oklahoma it is not hard to title a HotRod, you must save all receipts for major components and body parts and pieces and if donor car,the previous paper work notarized bill of sale. If you buy something from a salvage yard,you need part numbers on the bill of sale and what they came out of with salvage yard receipt. When done with construction and safe for road,take photos of all sides of the vehicle and copies of the receipts with total spent,and proof of car insurance,you have to a TAG Agency (license plate agency),fill out all the paperwork(you tell them what yr it represents) and pay the registration fee and they mail it in for you.3-4 weeks later the state will send them or you a VIN that you have to have stamped into the frame on the drivers side, and after that you have to drive it to a Tag Agency for inspection (not bad) and you pay the tag,tax and present year registration and you get a license tag and a title follows later in the mail. (go on a slow day, to get papers filled out) It worked for me in 2007. GOOD LUCK

[edit] Oregon

Getting a title in Oregon is not too difficult if everything is in order. Keep all your receipts if you are building the car from the ground up. If you have no documentation for ownership of the car, you need these receipts. They will check places where VIN is hidden by the factory like on the frame. Actually Chevrolet didn't have VIN until 1950, but used a thin piece of metal with a series number placed under the drivers floor carpet, which is the first thing to rot away.

If no numbers are visible, they will check to make sure that the frame is original to the vehicle, and not aftermarket. If it's aftermarket, you need a receipt. Same with a aftermarket body. You need a receipt, point of origin, bill of sale, then they will enter this information into their computer base and if its clear, you will be issued a form to take to DMV to get a sticker with a new VIN. then you need to stamp those numbers somewhere on the frame, so if the vehicle is ever stolen, you can identify where its stamped so they will know where to look. Even if the numbers are ground off, they can still find them.

If you are trying to register a car from another state, they just look for the VIN number and verify it with the title you are presenting.

Update: According to who you have to deal with at a DMV, getting past them can be a real difficult.

After getting the OK from the state police who issued the certificate for a VIN number, I went to the DMV, expecting a normal transaction. They handed me 5 pages of forms to fill out, wanting to know how I came to own the car, all the receipts, pictures. I did that, then back to the DMV, got a different person. 3 more pages of forms, did that. Then they wanted copies of EVERY receipt I had, probably 500 pages. Finally after some talking, I convinced the guy that the state police had already seen all these receipts and that if it's good enough for them it should be good enough for the DMV, so he settled for copies of the major components: engine, tranny, rear end, etc. Then he issued a VIN sticker. And you have to have the car there so THEY can apply the sticker. Then they issue you a 90 day trip permit so a special committee can review everything, but I don't expect a problem from them.

The whole idea is to document the car as much as possible, like photos of the build process. Keep EVERY receipt you get. Remember they are there to make sure this vehicle isn't stolen and they will do everything to find out if it is.

[edit] More info:

In Oregon vehicles were titled by engine number until 1955, then the vehicle was assigned a VIN to frame and body. The change was made due to motors being changed as they wore out. All vehicles made prior to 1955 are very easy to obtain a title for. Simply produce a bill of sale or a title to vehicle with a VIN inspection done by Oregon State Police or any law enforcement officer or a DMV investigator and a 550 form (obtained at DMV). All these are taken to the DMV and a VIN will be assigned.

[edit] Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, in order to register and title a hot rod, first the vehicle must be 1948 or older. No vehicles 1949 or newer can be registered as hot rods.

[edit] Rules regarding a collectable plate:

You may be able to title your ride as a "collectible". There are a few reasons why and I will try to explain here.

You cannot title a kit vehicle as a collectable. You must have a title and VIN tag (or copy of said tag) for the vehicle. The title and VIN must match. There is one stipulation in Pennsylvania. You cannot apply for a title or plate if the title has been considered "SCRAP" or "SCRAP" has been written on the title anywhere.

(1) A collectible is a vehicle that can be driven like any street vehicle but it is covered by state inspection laws regarding (a) the year and make (b) the engine (emissions exemption). If the engine was produced prior to the emissions laws, it will require no catalytic converters, EGR or PCV system.

  • Example: If you install a 1994 351 EFI Windsor, you will be required to have the computer, the cats, EGR etc.etc. Your ride will require an emission (exempt) sticker and a safety sticker that applies to the period of the vehicle.

(2) This is a one time (life of the vehicle) fee and you receive a black and gold colored license plate. This plate remains with the owner and may be used on any qualified collectible vehicle at a one time fee of $75.00 per vehicle. There is a family clause that allows the plate to be transferred inside the family circle. There is a $22.50 fee, plus a $6.00 fee for this transfer.

[edit] Making a plate application:

The following forms will be required. (a) Certificate of Title (MV-4) and a Vehicle Sales Use Tax form for registration. (OR) (b) An OUT OF STATE title and the (MV-1) form for transfer and application for COLLECTIBLE PLATE. You will need to sign and pay sales tax (6%) based upon the value of the sale. (this can get very expensive). Once you have a title you can apply for plates as required; either at time of transfer or later, if you are still working on the vehicle. Remember, in PA the title of certificate is the MV-4 certificate.

Now here is where it gets sticky... you must submit 6 photos of the vehicle at time of plate registration (even at time of title transfer). One photo from each side, one from rear and one from front. You also should submit one photo of the engine compartment and one of the exhaust system! That is correct, rack the vehicle and take a shot of that exhaust. I suggest you take a photo of the engine codes and markings. If your vehicle is "low-slung" (dropped axle) you also should document the steering, brakes and road clearances. All this information will help you obtain a collectible plate for your ride. This information will be submitted along with your application for a plate. You could wait up to 8 weeks for an answer, and even then PennDOT may require more documentation. It can be a real nightmare.

NOTE: When applying for collectible plates alone, you must have your "R" title brand certificate (reconstruction), at time of application. You will fill out an MV-11 form for this application. There is an MV-426B Form that allows you to obtain a title and plates when you have a non "R" rated title or a salvage certificate (I don't think you want to go here).

Antique, classic and modified titles and plate information is not covered here.

[edit] Rhode Island

You must have a previous registration and a bill of sale for a vehicle older than ten years. If you put one together you have to have the numbers for each major part and a bill of sale. I was told that I had to show a history for each major item, frame ,tranny, engine, and etc. Plus a bill of sale or a sales slip for each and every part. The state frowns on crate motors (no history). Then the state has to inspect it so they can issue you a title from Rhode Island. A more viable route is to register it in another state and then use that registration for RI. A company like Broadway Title offers this type of service.

[edit] South Carolina

In order to title a 'rebuilt' vehicle, you will need the following:

  • Surrender any previous titles
  • Complete Form 400, Application for Title --
  • Complete Form 4038, Affidavit of Rebuilt/Homemade Vehicle --
  • Complete Form 401A, Application for a Special Serial Number --
  • Invoices, bills, other proof of purchase --
  • Liability insurance information--
  • Paid vehicle property tax receipt --
  • Pay fees ($15 title, $24 registration/license
  • Vehicles will not need to get a special serial number if you have a valid previous title and VIN.

[edit] South Dakota

Getting clear information on your options is difficult. I spent a week on the phone carousel and finally talked to a woman at the capitol that gave me this information.

One way is to do an assembled vehicle and keep track of your receipts, and importantly any items that you paid sales tax on. Then you use an Affidavit Rebuilt Motor Vehicle DOR-MV 950 10/92. This is the same form you would use to make one vehicle from 2 and is formatted more for that purpose. When using this method you will file the form after the car is finished at which time it gets inspected and they may or may not title it as the vehicle you choose (say a '29 Ford roadster) or as a home built I guess depending on how the inspecting officer views it.

Another method is to bring a notarized bill of sale for a basically whole vehicle and after they run the serial number and are satisfied your aren't of felonious intent (my words) they they will proceed to issue a new title. Now she didn't spell this out and was rather vague but I am going to assume there is going to be some value determined and tax levied in addition to a $25 fee.

[edit] Tennessee

The following applies to fiberglass bodied cars and trucks bought as a kit.

In-state Custom Vehicles If you custom-built the car in Tennessee, you'll need to take the following steps in order to get your vehicle registered:

Visit the local county clerk's office to apply for a Reconstructed Title. You'll need to take your car's documentation with you, including all receipts for parts, whether used or new. The clerk will send the information to the Vehicle Services Section in Nashville. Once in Nashville, your documents will undergo a "paper inspection" to verify that standards are met. After your documents are verified, they'll be sent to a field investigator who'll inspect your vehicle to make sure all Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) match. If everything matches, you'll be issued a Reconstructed Title. The fee for a reconstructed title is $90 to be paid when you first visit the county clerk's office.

For more information about reconstructed titles, contact any of the special agents listed at the Criminal Investigations Division (CID) website.

Vehicle Services Section http://www.dmv.org/loading-page.php?mainnav_id=52&stateid=42&state=&section=Custom+Built+Car+Registration&url=http%3A%2F%2Fstate.tn.us%2Frevenue%2Fvehicle%2Fcontactinfo.htm

CID http://www.dmv.org/loading-page.php?mainnav_id=52&stateid=42&state=&section=Custom+Built+Car+Registration&url=http%3A%2F%2Ftennessee.gov%2Fsafety%2FCID.htm

[edit] Texas

[edit] Texas bonded title info

I may miss a step or 2 but the process goes something like this if it hasn't been titled in the last 16 years, which is how far back the state's records are kept.

You'll need a bill of sale and the following forms from the state:

  • VTR-275 Request for Texas Motor Vehicle Information
  • VTR-301 Request for Pencil Tracing of Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)
  • VTR-34-F Certified Copy of Title Fact Sheet
  • VTR-130-SOF Statement of Fact
  • VTR-131 Request to Issue Negotiable Certificate of Title Without Registration (Title Only)

VTR-275, Fill this one out and mail it in with the fee of $2.30. This starts the title search with the state, if it hasn't been titled in the last 16 years you will receive a rejection letter.

It is no longer necessary to have the vehicle appraised by a dealer or other appraiser, unless the State of Texas is unable to determine a value (which certainly could be the case for a hot rod.) From the Texas DMV Bonded Title page: "The Standard Presumptive Value (SPV) from our Web site (www.TxDMV.gov) as the primary source If a SPV is not available, a national reference guide, National Auto Dealers Association (NADA) will be used. If a value is not available either through SPV or NADA, a licensed motor vehicle dealer or insurance adjuster may appraise the vehicle on a form provided by VTR."

Accompanying the rejection letter from the Texas Dept. of Transportation is an Insurance company list where you will go and purchase a surety bond. The fee is 1.5% of the value of the vehicle.

Fill out form 130, Statement of Fact, then along with all the other paperwork gathered from the above sequence, take it to your county tax office, and in turn they provide you with the bonded title. The bonded title is for 3 years; at the end of the 3rd year you can exchange the bonded title for a permanent one.

[edit] Texas vehicle title and registration FAQs and popular related links

If your car is 25 or more years old, you can get an "antique" license plate. These are good for 5 years, cost is $70.00 and that is only if you say you bought the car for $1.00. I paid .06 cent on that dollar for sales tax so what ever you say that you buy it for you will pay $0.06 on the dollar for it on sales tax over the $70.00. Your car doesn't have to have safety inspections. Per the law, your antique car is only to be driven to/from a show, or to have work done. But I've never been stopped in 15 years, and you could always say you were going for an oil change or alignment, etc.

Another option you have is if your vehicle originally had no VIN. This means no data plate, no frame number, or no original engine number. From what I have been told by the DPS up to 1954 all vehicles were registered with the motor number. GM vehicles did not have frame numbers until 1949, Ford had frames numbers from 1932. This also covers assembled vehicles using a manufactured prefabricated body.

For vehicles with no VIN number first go to your local DMV where you normally get your plates. Ask for a Form VTR-68-A Application for assigned or reassigned number. Ask them which law enforcement you need to call to have them come by and inspect the vehicle. The local Anti-Auto Theft Task Force is the normal ones that come out. They will inspect the vehicle and ask you a few simple questions, show them the bill of sale with the PO's name and address. Make sure they check the right boxes. The ones you want checked say, Vehicle assembled from parts for which no ID number was ever affixed to body. And the other says, Unable to determine the true manufacturers number. If they check the box that says, Number assigned by manufacturer for ID purposes has been removed, changed or obliterated, you will have to take a form letter to a judge and prove ownership of the vehicle.

Now once you have that done take the paperwork and your vehicle to a regional DMV/DOT office. They may tell you that you don't have to take the vehicle but take it anyway, if there are any problems they can call and have another inspector come over and take care of them on the spot. Once there you'll have to fill out a Form VTR-61 Rebuilt Affidavit. On that you will explain all the modifications done on the vehicle. Make sure you have the name and address of your suppliers, ie engine, body, frame, trans etc, with bills of sale. Then they will assign a VIN number to the vehicle. Cost $2.00. On your way home stop by a public scale and get a weight slip, you'll need it later.

Now to get your title and plates take the Form VTR-61,a pencil tracing of the motor number, the Form VTR-68-N Notice of Assigned Number(from the regional office), copy of Form 68-A, photo of vehicle, Form VTR-470 green slip from safety inspection station, weight slip, original bill of sale and proof of insurance to your local DMV office and they will then issue you your title and plates after you pay the taxes and fees.

Go online, print out the application for antique plates and fill it out. Go to the DMV or county with this form, your driver's license and insurance for the vehicle. You're done...

[edit] Short cut on older vehicles when VIN was the engine number only

Take your purchased title, or New York registration, etc. to the DMV (or auto title company) and ask for "title transfer only". (It is purchasing the plates that triggers most of the above.) In a few weeks you will receive your new Texas title. Now go buy the plates. No questions asked, no inspections necessary. Get a vehicle ID plate engraved with the number on the title and attach it to the firewall. Go get a state inspection.

[edit] Utah

For information, contact the DMV, 801-297-7780 or 1-800-DMV-UTAH (800-368-8824). A special inspector will be sent to your location from a Special DMV section located at 380 West 2880 South, SLC 84115, to inspect your vehicle, and look for identification markings/VIN. I recommend visiting the office in person to schedule the inspection. Kit Cars normally require a Manufacturers Statement of Origin (MSO), and both Kit Cars and home-builts will be titled as a new vehicle in the current year (ie 2009).

[edit] Vermont

[edit] Virginia

This is the list of items you need to send to the Virginia DMV to title a Replica Motor Vehicle, assuming that you have a Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin (MSO), and no VIN (what they call a "kit car"):

  • Virginia Form VSA 22, Application for Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)
  • VSA 17A, Application for Vehicle Title
  • Notarized Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin (MSO)
  • Bill of sale for the body and frame
  • Bill of sale for the engine
  • Bill of sale for the transmission
  • Notarized statement of vehicle construction
  • Photo of the vehicle in ready-to-run condition
  • A check in the amount of:
    • $130.00 for VIN application and fees
    • plus $10.00 for the Title,
    • plus 3% of the value of the body, frame, engine and transmission (they don’t seem to care about all the other receipts)
  • Proof of Virginia residence

More information concerning costs and documents can be found at the following website. http://www.dmv.state.va.us/webdoc/citizen/vehicles/titling.asp

It looks like you submit all of the same stuff even if you have a title. Just don't send in the VIN application.

Disclaimer: Don’t depend on the customer service line to give you accurate information.

The definition of replica vehicles is here: Definition of "Replica Vehicle"

The law for titling replica vehicles is here: 46.2-602.1. Titling and registration of replica vehicles.

[edit] Washington

To start with one needs to visit the DOL website:

Vehicle Registration website

Vehicle Dealer and Manufacturer Manual

When building a hotrod or replica car I have found it vital to keep a file with all of the receipts for materials and parts as well as any titles of parts cars that may have been purchased. When substantially complete the car must be taken to a State Patrol inspection station and if the paperwork is in order then a new title can be issued. Note in Washington State ownership (having title) does not mean the car can be driven as the State has a provision for title purposes only. Emissions is a separate agency and has its own set of rules.

When a person starts collecting parts for a project that will need to be titled start a book on it. A three ring binder with page savers works well. Save each receipt no matter how insignificant you feel it is. documentation of major parts is especially important. If the engine, trans and rear axle came from a donor car, include paperwork that shows you purchased or owned the donor. The bill of sale for the donor or a photo copy of the title. A written and photo log of the build in the book is a good idea too.

It should also be noted that Washington will not issue you a title for a fabricated vehicle (car, motorcycle, vintage travel trailer, etc) for three years. You will receive a "registration only". After the three years have passed, provided that no one has laid claim to the VIN of your vehicle, you may apply for the title.

[edit] West Virginia

In West Virginia, registering your custom-built car can be the same as registering any other vehicle, or it can be a much more tedious process―it all depends on where the car was built.

[edit] Built out of state

If your car was custom-built out of state―good news. You'll only need to follow the same registration process as you would for any other vehicle (submitting completed forms and all applicable fees to your local DMV office).

[edit] Built in state

However, if you custom-built the car in West Virginia, you'll need to take a few more steps. Before you can register and title the car at the DMV, you're required to visit your local West Virginia State Police detachment with a verification of vehicle identification number (VIN) form. The officer who assists you will verify that there is no VIN already assigned to the vehicle.

This extra step also ensures that neither the car nor its parts have been stolen. The DMV suggests keeping receipts or other records of purchase to show the officer who assists you, just in case.

Note that regardless of where the car was built, you'll need to follow the same steps as outlined in our Car Registration section.

[edit] Registering for the first time

If you're registering your vehicle in West Virginia for the first time, your registration process will depend on whether you purchased your vehicle from a dealership or an individual. If you purchased your vehicle from a dealership, the dealer will handle all paperwork for you and you'll be charged the applicable fees right there. If you purchased your vehicle from an individual, you'll need to take care of the registration at your local Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) office.

Whether you purchased your vehicle from a dealership or individual, the fees will be the same:

  • Privilege tax of 5% of the purchase price if you paid at least half of the vehicle's book value; if not, you will pay 5% of the low book value.
  • If you purchased the vehicle for less than 50% of the loan value as reported by "The Automobile Red Book," the tax will be based on the loan value unless you present a notarized bill of sale.
  • If you are moving to West Virginia from out of state, the tax will be based on the loan value of the vehicle as reported by "The Automobile Red Book."
  • $5 to record any lien information.
  • $30 for your license plate.
  • $10 for your title (which can be handled at the same time you handle your registration).

New residents must title and register their vehicles within 30 days of establishing West Virginia residency.

Source: www.dmv.org/wv-west-virginia/custom-built-cars.php

[edit] Wisconsin

[edit] Summary

Wisconsin's hot rod community was the first in the nation to successfully pressure their state government for regulations governing modified or homemade vehicles. These regulations have gone on to become a template for SEMA's model legislation and the regulations adopted in many other states across the nation. Wisconsin's "Hobby Plate" celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2006 and the regulations have been improved and updated numerous times since they were first passed in 1976. (See Street Rodder, Primedia Specialty Group Inc., August 2006, pp 66-68).

While Wisconsin is something of a success story in terms of its laws, that does not mean the state is without its problems. Many rodders still encounter difficulty with their local or state DMV offices, primarily because state employees are not properly trained and informed of the Hobby Plate. In addition, the Wisconsin State Patrol has been found to be improperly trained and knowledgeable about the state's own regulations.

Wisconsin offers lifetime, non-expiring, non-personalized hobbyist license plates to replicas, street-modified vehicles, and reconstructed vehicles, all of which must be at least 20 years old, or replicas of a vehicle that is at least 20 years old. These regulations are different from collector registrations, which are available for vehicles that haven't been altered or modified.

Different regulations apply to different classifications of vehicles. Generally, a street modified vehicle would be what is typically known as a hot rod or street rod, and it's specified as a vehicle that "can still be recognized as the original year and make". A reconstructed vehicle is one that is "no longer recognizable as the original vehicle". Registration for reconstructed vehicles requires bills of sale for all major parts used in the vehicle, as well as an inspection by a Wisconsin State Patrol Officer. A fourth, less common specification, motorized homemade vehicle, is designated as a vehicle that "must have been constructed from new or used parts not originating from or resembling a previously manufactured motor vehicle". Motorized homemade vehicles also require inspection by a Wisconsin State Patrol Officer prior to registration.

[edit] Hobby vehicles which already have a VIN

Wisconsin offers lifetime, non-expiring, non-personalized hobbyist license plates in the following categories:

a)Reconstructed Vehicle b)Motorized homemade vehicle c)Street Modified Vehicle d)Replica Vehicle

A) RECONSTRUCTED VEHICLES are defined as follows:

  • Vehicle must be constructed from a vehicle at least 20 years old.
  • Vehicle must no longer be recognizable as the original vehicle.
  • Vehicle must be inspected by a Wisconsin State Patrol Officer.
  • Application materials must include bills of sale for all major parts

Reconstructed vehicles normally refer to a salvage (junked) vehicle which has been reconstructed but the original title was declared "salvaged". These vehicles must meet the safety standards which applied in the year the vehicle was originally built. Because of their unique nature (having a "salvaged title") most hot rods will NOT be titled under this category. Some rodders also avoid this category because of the required state safety inspection.

B) MOTORIZED HOMEMADE VEHICLES are defined as follows:

  • Homemade motor vehicles, other than motorcycles, qualify for Hobbyist plates.
  • Vehicle must have been constructed from new or used parts not originating from or resembling a previously manufactured motor vehicle.
  • Homemade motorcycles that replicate a cycle at least 20 years old.
  • Vehicle must be inspected by a Wisconsin State Patrol Officer.

The Homemade Vehicle category is the most difficult of all the categories because it requires that the vehicle pass the safety requirements for the year the vehicle was COMPLETED - not the year it might replicate or mimic. For example, if the car was completed in 2006, it would have to meet the exact same safety and pollution standards as a 2006 Lexus. Most rodders avoid this category like the plague.

C) STREET MODIFIED VEHICLES are defined as follows:

  • Vehicle must be at least 20 years old.
  • Vehicle may be modified from the original manufacturer's specifications.
  • Vehicle can still be recognized as the original year and make.
  • Vehicles are typically known as "hot rods" or "street rods."

By its very definition, this is the category most hot rods fit into. In order to title a vehicle in this category the owner must file form MV2855. This is a surprisingly simple PDF form which designates the VIN, year, model and weight of the car along with your name and address. Most notably this form also serves as a "self affirmation" that the vehicle meets all applicable state safety requirements. In the case of Street Modified and Replica vehicles, the applicable safety requirements are those that were in effect IN THE YEAR THE VEHICLE WAS ORIGINALLY CONSTRUCTED. Thus, if you have a 1932 Ford, you must meet the safety requires that were in effect in 1932. There is no state safety inspection required for vehicles in this category. It should be noted, however, that state or local police CAN cite you for safety violations if they should stop you and determine you are not in compliance. In the event this happens, the owner needs to be intimately familiar with the state code governing these vehicles.

In order to title the vehicle the owner should take the original title for the vehicle along with a completed form MV2855 to the local DMV office where they will also fill out form MV-1 which is the standard "Title/License Plate Application".

Street Modified vehicles qualify for either a normal license plate (personalized plates, etc.) or a Hobbyist Plate. The advantage of a hobby plate is that you pay a one time fee, approximately $160, but then the plate is good for your lifetime. It can also be transferred to another car should you sell the existing car and purchase another which also qualifies for the Hobby plate. If you purchase additional qualified vehicles, the plate cost for each is reduced to $110.

In the event the owner does not have a title (but the vehicle has an original VIN) you must apply for a replacement title using state form MV-1. The WDOT may require that the VIN be inspected and certified by a law enforcement officer (state or local police) and then their certification forwarded to the WDOT.

D) REPLICA VEHICLES are defined as follows:

  • Vehicle is a reproduction of a vehicle originally made by another manufacturer.
  • Vehicle must replicate a vehicle at least 20 years old.
  • "Kit cars" may be replicas.
  • May need to have MV2855 PDF completed.

The Replica Vehicle category is quite similar to the Street Modified category but applies when the builder has purchased the major components (body, chassis, etc) new from an after market manufacturer rather than assembling older parts from original vehicles. In many cases these manufacturers will supply a certification of construction along with a bill of sale. In most cases, however, these vehicles will not have a VIN and the owner will have to follow the process for obtaining a VIN as described below.

Replica Vehicles do not require a state safety inspection. Instead, the owner will complete form MV2855 to "self certify" that the vehicle meets all required safety standards. As with Street Modified vehicles, the applicable safety standards are those for the year the car replicates. For example, if you have 1932 Ford kit car, it must meet the safety requirements in place during 1932.

[edit] Hobby vehicles without a VIN

In the event your vehicle does not have a VIN you will need to have the state assign one. Unfortunately, there are no directions on the WDOT web site to do this and very little in the state regulations. However, Curt Rymkus, who sat on the state legislative committee which wrote the original Hobby Plate legislation, as well as all of the updates to those regulations, offers a solution. In a 2006 interview, he said that the process for obtaining a VIN for a street rod or hot rod is as follows:

a) Fill out and submit form MV2855 to the state DOT office. Include a written notation that the vehicle requires a new VIN.

b) The State office of DOT "should" respond with a request for copies of your receipts for all major components of the vehicle (engine, trans, body, frame etc.). This information is to insure that applicable sales taxes have been paid for all of your components. Copy and submit these receipts.

c) Once the receipts are submitted, the state DOT "should" respond by sending you a state assigned VIN already stamped on a metal plate.

d) The owner must attach the VIN to the vehicle as instructed by WDOT.

e) The owner must then schedule an appointment with a state or local police officer to inspect and certify the installation of the VIN. The officer will provide you with the form which he will complete.

f) Submit the inspection form to WDOT

g) Then continue the normal title/plate application process using form MV-1

Note the "shoulds" in the above description. Some local and state DOT employees as well as some State Police Officers have not been trained in this process and do NOT know how these applications are handled. So the applicant may need to make some follow up inquiries and/or phone calls if the state DOT does not seem to be responding properly.

[edit] Antique and collector cars

Please note that antique and collector cars, cars which are stock, restored or minimally modified, are titled and licensed under different regulations than hot rods. For more information, see Wisconsin Antique and Collector Cars Regulations.

Full details are available at the: Hobbyist License Plates section of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation.

  • To register a hobbyist vehicle, you must have at least one other vehicle currently registered in Wisconsin under the same name.
  • To operate a hobbyist vehicle during the month of January, you must purchase a temporary plate for $30.
  • An emission test is required for the following counties: Kenosha, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Sheboygan, Waukesha, and Washington.
  • For most cars and trucks, the cost is about $150-$175, depending on weight. A $50 discount is offered if this is your second and subsequent plate, or if it's being transferred from a vehicle you already own.
  • You can get a temporary plate while your hobbyist order is being processed. You can only operate a vehicle without a plate for two business days within your date of purchase.

[edit] Application process on WDOT website

  • Complete and sign the Hobbyist Registration Application form MV2388
  • If the vehicle is already titled in your name and:
    • Is currently registered and designated with one of the Hobbyist vehicle types, send a copy of your Certificate of Registration.
    • Is NOT currently registered, or is NOT designated with one of the Hobbyist vehicle types, send the actual Certificate of Title - not a photocopy.
  • If the vehicle is NOT titled in your name, send a completed Title Application form MV1 or MV11 and fees, including Hobbyist registration fees determined from fee table.
  • Make check or money order payable to: Registration Fee Trust
  • Mail to Wisconsin Department of Transportation (address below).

[edit] Contact details

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

  • E-mail: special-plates.dmv@dot.state.wi.us
  • Phone: (608) 266-3041 between 8 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. Monday through Friday.
  • Fax: (608) 267-5106
  • physical address: Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Special Plates Unit, P.O. Box 7911, Madison WI 53707-7911
  • When seeking a replica or street modified title for your hot rod, it is advisable to first speak with a representative of the DMV Research and Information office in Madison. They know the process and will guide you through the steps. Each rod can be a little different (i.e. a manufactured body with a Manufacturers Statement of Origin vs. an owner built body with no I.D. number) and this office can tailor your application to reduce any delays. This office is also where the application material and forms should first be submitted rather than just mailing the application to the DMV general office. The full address is: Research & Information, WI Dept. of Trans., P.O. Box 8070, Madison, WI 53708.

[edit] Additional resources

Rodders going through the title process should familiarize themselves with the applicable state codes and regulations. These regulations can be found in the following links.

[edit] Wyoming

I live in Laramie, Wyoming and have two 1984 GMC Sierra Classic trucks. I have no title for either. They tell me at the county seat that I must go to the original owner and have them fill out a form. I have no idea who the original owner was. I have had both trucks for several years. I haven't any idea what to do. One has no VIN. number at all!

If you are registering a street rod/hot rod as an antique, all you need to do is; insure the vehicle, go the your county tax collector's office, bring your proof of insurance, driver's license, and the Application for Antique License Plates. The fee is $50.00, and you are done. This automatically registers the vehicle as an antique, and you have none of the extra unnecessary paperwork to fill out, no titles to bring. Easy as 1,2 & 3.

[edit] Countries

[edit] Australia

(Click the edit link to the right of the word "Australia" to add or edit country-wide hot rod registration information for Australia. Click the edit link to the right of each state or territory to add or edit information for that particular state or territory).

[edit] New South Wales

[edit] Queensland

This section needs cleanup

  • Builder must be member of Hot-Rod-Club OR Club affiliated with national body.
  • Fabricated frames- OK. Builder MUST have proof of "Welding Proficiency" ie Trade papers / OR Tech. & Further education (T.A.F.E.)CERTIFICATE NFE.09
  • Wheelbase and track must conform to year specified.
  • Progressive inspections during build are done by Technical Advice Committee Inspectors. These guys are usually club members who have some degree of engineering expertise, and inspections MUST meet guidelines agreed to with Government Registration Requirements. Usually: Chassis first, set up with drivetrain, brakes, fuel lines, and tank all brackets & fittings but not painted so all welding can be inspected etc General body & paint with doors & interior fittings , pedals , dash,wiring & now the vehicle can be stripped down , painted ,chromed , upholstered . A final for the Certificate when the car has a Third Party Insurance ( for registration).
  • The TAC Inspector may require the vehicle to be driven to Road Test brakes & steering & ensure that all is as it is required to be. acertificate is then issued Various levels are available reducing registration costs the Rod or Custom may be driven as a normal factory turnout OR with cheaper Registration ONLY on or to Sanctioned Events or limited travel for repairs/ maintainance etc.

[edit] Russian Federation

Still no any law about performance modified street machines,so you can build anything,but avoid cops and ANY inspection!

[edit] South Australia

[edit] Tasmania

[edit] Victoria

[edit] Western Australia

This is my experience with building an A roadster from scratch and in particular the Registration/Licensing process.

Repro Chassis OK - Either commercially manufactured or home made. Stamp your own chassis number on a visible part of the rails. Under the Chassis is OK as long as it's visible. Guidelines are available to choose the correct material and it must be fully boxed & braced.

Repro Body OK. -Fibreglass or constructed from odd car panels to ressemble a pre 1948 vehicle. Eg; A model cowl with home made closed or open cab and home made pickup bed. If it looks like a '28 A Pickup then for all intensive purposes it is a '28 A pickup!

Registration/Licensing involves a three inspection process, where the car is inspected by TAC (Technical Advisory Committee) respresentatives whom are hot rodders registered with the appropriate Governement Department to carry out such inspections. These inspectors mostly have either an engineering or mechanical trades background. Before the inspection you need to submit a planning application for your project noting down excatly what model, year and style of hot rod you are going to build. Also needs to include, what Engine, G/box, Diff, Suspension, etc. you are going to use.

1st Inspection - Rolling chassis rails must be boxed and completely welded with all crossmembers and suspension in place. Does not require engine or trans to be in place but does require any welded mounts for these to be in place. Basically any part that requires welding to the chassis needs to be present. No paint anywhere so that welds can all be visually inspected. Once inspected chassis can be painted/detailed if you wish. Chassis welding can be performed by owners but note that any dodgy welds will require grinding out and re-doing or in some cases the whole chassis may be refused. If in doubt of your welding skills then it's best to tack it all together and have a pro finish the job for you.

2nd Inspection - Body on rolling chassis. All door locks, etc in place. Engine, G/box & Diff all in place. Exhaust system, brake lines in place (but not necessarily working) Steering column hooked up & working, Seats & brake/clutch & accelerator pedals in position. All instruments in place. Head, Tail lights & Indicators in place (but not necessarily working). This inspection is to generally check the operational location of everything, such as drivers seating position relative to the vehicles controls, instrumentation & vision. Body and seat/seat belt mounting & mechanical fits & clearances, etc. From this stage the car is genrally torn down and detailed then rebuilt to it's final stage.

3rd Inspection - The car is presented for inspection in it's complete finished form. This inspection usually takes place just before registration and is the final step before presenting the car for a government department inspection and subsequent licensing/registration.

Governemt Departmental Inspection - (Department of Planning & Infrastructure) With the TAC Inspection papers signed off and in the owners hands the car and owner present the car for a government based inspection. In Western Australia this is carried out by the Department of Planning & Infrastructure. They have several inspection centres across the state and in Metro areas. The owner arrives with his signed off TAC inpection papers and the Departments officers then carry out their own inspection of the vehicle. Once completed they sign off all the paperwork and you then go to the Registration office (usually on the same premises) and pay the registration fee PLUS the Governemt Stamp Duty which is based on a value that you provide them with.

[edit] Some points I noted with our system are:
  • The system, both from a TAC & a Government Department view, is very much honesty based.
  • The TAC inspectors are there to help you rather than hinder your vehicle getting registered.
  • I found the governemnt inspectors to be very easy to get along with (Welshpool Depot) with no gung ho or rambo sentiment!
  • You make up your own chassis number, they don't provide it. For eg; My 1st rod was Tang28-001, made up from part of my surname, the year of the car and '001' for the first rod I built. My rails were original but they had no visible chassis number I could find.
  • I was NOT asked for proof of ownership or any past registration history - the roadster was built from bits & pieces from all over the place.
  • The finished vehicle value I stated was NOT questioned even though I had kept a log of all the expenses involved in building the car and offered to provide a copy. They weren't interested! (though I would suggest that rod builders don't go too low becuase obviously if you sell the car for double what you valued it at you leave yourself liable to be questioned about the indifference)
  • ALL HOTRODS currently being newly registered in Western Australia are on a B CLASS license. This simply means that you have to present the car for inspection every 12 months when your yearly registration fee is due. The inspection is carried out by the TAC inspectors and NOT the Government department. A small fee is charged for this inspection and most see it as a good opportunity for a regular check up of the vehicle rather than an incursion of their rights. Of course some see it the other way too! That's good old human nature at work! Be a bugger if we all thought the same...
  • I was asked to provide a photo of my car prior to it being registered. I beleive this picture is kept on file at the Departments office where the vehicle was inspected. As all my pictures were digital I simply provided a printed off copy from my computer that was printed onto a standard sheet of A4 paper. They were happy with that. I beleive that now either the TAC or the Government Department inspectors take their own pictures?
[edit] Summary:

This is a very breif overview based mainly on my own experience and what I've read from information provided by the TAC reps. Of course some may have other experiences which reflect negatively on the system and in some cases they may have some merit? From what I know of the other Australian States, Western Australia has possibly one of the best systems in Australia? One downside (my opinion only) for Western Australia is that to the best of my knowledge we don't have an SR (Street Rod), Limited or Special registration scheme as per the Victorian example (and possibly other states). Once you own a couple of street rods AND a couple of family cars the expense of registering them all gets a bit out of hand? It would be nice to have a choice of both systems? ie; Full Registration and Street Rod or Special (read cheaper) Registration.

It is my understanding that a hot rod builder can go outside of the TAC guidelines and as such bypass the three inspection process? To do this he/she will require the services a mechanical engineer to sign off all aspects of the vehicle. The engineer must be authorised by the Department of Planning & Infrastrucure to carry out these vehicle assessments. This can be a costly route but if you wish to construct a rod that is outside the guidelines then it is your only choice. With the extra cost involved aside, it is getting increasingly difficult to find suitably authorised engineers who are prepared to sign off modifications. It's more to do with the current atmosphere surrounding litigation laws than anything else, ie; When or if something goes wrong, who is going to take responsibility? The owner or the engineer who signed the modifications off?

[edit] Disclaimer:

Just for the record I have no affiliation with either the TAC representatives or the Department of Planning and Infrastructure in Western Australia. I have deliberately steered clear of re-writing the guidelines as they are in published form and readily available elesewhere. Like I said earlier, it's all just from my own experience. Please DO NOT take any of the above as a definative text book copy of the rules and regulations. It's just one rodders opinion of how the system worked for him in a positve way.

It is a shame, that after all that work and red tape, that the hot rod ends up on B class registration. Similarly it is difficult to know what is a hot rod and what is a modified old car with just some logical improvements due to technology and concerns for safety etc. The annual inspection fee is getting too high and there is no real basis for the license class discrimination. In the future it is anticipated that all hot rods will be given full A class registration in line with the commitment to the National Build Codes and the past changes granted to Left Hand Drive and imported vehicles. A class action legal challenge is being considered if this does not eventuate in the near future.

[edit] Australian Capital Territory

[edit] Jervis Bay Territory

[edit] Northern Territory

[edit] Canada

[edit] Ontario

[edit] Note about this information:

Canadian rodder presents this information exacty as provided by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation. It has not been edited except to format it for presentation purposes. We are not in a position to interpret the information beyond what is stated or to give advice on unique situations. We hope you will find this information useful.

Contact information for the Ministry can be found at the bottom of this page.

[edit] Registering a vehicle in Ontario

[edit] About “street rods/hot rods”

The Ministry of Transportation (MTO) does not have any specific registration requirements for Street Rods under the Highway Traffic Act. Furthermore, we do not have any legal definition of either "street rod" or "hot rod", nor does MTO record this on vehicle permits.

However, the Ministry of the Environment, solely for the purposes of emission inspection requirements under the Drive Clean program, has a legal definition of "hot rod"

Hot Rod: a motor vehicle in which the original motor has been replaced with a motor of a type not installed by the manufacturer on that model year of motor vehicle.

Reference: Ontario Regulation 361-98, made under the Environmental Protection Act - Motor Vehicles http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/980361_e.htm

[edit] Classic or historic vehicles

The term "classic" or "custom" cars are not defined by MTO, nor are either of these terms used on vehicle permits.

If by classic, you mean an antique, vintage or historic motor vehicle, certain antique vehicles are eligible for special licence plates. Owners of "historic vehicles" (model year 30 years ago or older) are eligible to purchase the reduced-fee, limited use "HVA" historic licence plates, or to apply to use vintage "Year of Manufacture - YOM" licence plates.

[edit] Custom vehicles - kit cars/rebuilt vehicles

With respect to custom cars, the Ministry of Transportation does have specific registration requirements for kit cars and rebuilt vehicles. Information on registration requirements for a kit car or rebuilt vehicle is below.

[edit] Kit car

Definition: a complete body of a motor vehicle, not including an engine, chassis or drive train. Kit body is a replica of an existing or vintage motor vehicle.

Kit cars are registered in Ontario as:

  • VIN: Assigned as "ASD" if no 17 -digit VIN on dashboard of kit body
  • Make: Manufacturer of kit
  • Model: KIT
  • Model Year: Year that the kit car was completed and registered with the ministry. If there is not an existing 17-digit VIN on the dashboard, you may request the licence office to provide you with a ministry assigned VIN, which you should affix to the dashboard. A VIN is needed before you can obtain a Safety Standards Certificate.

[edit] Rebuilt vehicle

Constructed using various main component parts (body, chassis or frame) obtained from other vehicles or from auto wreckers, dealers or manufacturers, and whose vehicle identification number (VIN), make, model or model year has been affected by this reconstruction. Rebuilt vehicles are registered in Ontario as:

  • VIN: Of body of the vehicle (CHASSIS/FRAME VIN is not used). If there is no longer an existing VIN on the dashboard, you may request the licence issuing office to provide you with a ministry - assigned as RBT VIN, which you should affix to the dashboard. A VIN is needed before you can obtain a Safety Standards Certificate.
  • Make: Manufacturer of body of the vehicle (CHASSIS/FRAME manufacturer is not used)
  • Model: RBT
  • Model year: Year that the motor vehicle car was rebuilt and registered with the ministry.

[edit] Homemade vehicle

Constructed without using manufactured main components (e.g. body/chassis/frame made from scratch), and therefore has no VIN. NOTE: This designation is primarily for homemade trailers, constructed by the owner.

Homemade vehicles are registered in Ontario as:

  • VIN: assigned "HOM"
  • Make: HOME
  • Model: HOM
  • Model year: Year the homemade vehicle was built and registered with the ministry.

Kit cars are not homemade vehicles, for registration purposes. Kit car owners should be aware of a problem with the misuse of the "homemade" classification in registering their motor vehicles.

There have been a number of kit cars which have been incorrectly registered in the past as "homemade," and it appears that this is usually because of the owner misusing the term "homebuilt vehicle" on the notarized affidavit filed with MTO.

Please note that there is no such term on vehicle permits as "homebuilt," and the term "homebuilt" should not be used on notarized affidavits filed with MTO, as it does not properly describe the vehicle, or the origin of the major component parts.

Furthermore, if your kit car is incorrectly registered as model "HOM" instead of model "KIT", you will not be eligible for any exemption from the Drive Clean inspection requirement.

The only motor vehicles which should be registered as "homemade" by MTO, are motor vehicles where both the body and the chassis/frame have been completely constructed by the owner from scratch, without the benefit of a kit or a guide for assembly of the parts, or the purchase of a specialty frame or kit body, or a guide to construct the kit body and/or frame.

[edit] Correcting permit from model "Hom" (or other) to model "KIT"

If a kit car has been incorrectly registered as model "HOM", to correct the registration, it will be necessary to file a new notarized affidavit with MTO. The new affidavit must properly identify the vehicle as a "KIT," and clearly state the name and address of the manufacturer of the kit or kit body, and also the VIN for the chassis, if the chassis was taken from another vehicle, and the name and address of the previous owner of the chassis. If a specialty frame was used in the construction, instead of using a chassis from another used motor vehicle, this must also be stated in the affidavit, and you must give the name and address of the manufacturer of the specialty frame. If the specialty frames does not have a VIN, this should also be stated. We will also need the serial number of the engine and what vehicle it was taken from (make, model year and VIN) and the name and address of the previous owner.

[edit] VIN requirements

Assigned vehicle identification numbers (VINs) are issued for three groups of vehicles: rebuilt motor vehicles, kit cars, and homemade vehicles (NOTE: most of these are homemade trailers).

The prefix for a rebuilt vehicle VIN is RBT, for a kit car, ASD, and for a homemade vehicle, HOM. In all cases where an assigned VIN is required, the documentation required for registration would include a sworn affidavit (statutory declaration), describing where the main component parts (body, chassis/frame and engine, if applicable) were obtained, the reason that an assigned VIN is required, and a statement that the applicant is the legal and rightful owner of the completed vehicle.

[edit] Kit car

If a kit car does not have a 17-digit vehicle identification number (VIN) on the dashboard, MTO will assign a VIN starting with "ASD" at the time the owner brings in the notarized affidavit for the vehicle, and registers it as "unfit" and unplated. The owner then gets the safety standards certificate using the ASD VIN

[edit] Rebuilt vehicle

For a rebuilt vehicle where the body VIN cannot be determined, MTO will assign a 17 digit VIN starting with "RBT" at the time the owner brings in the notarized affidavit for the vehicle, and registers it as "unfit" and unplated. The owner then gets the safety standards certificate using the RBT VIN.

[edit] Registration requirements for kit cars/rebuilt vehicles

The following items should be presented at any at any independently operated Driver and Vehicle Licence: Issuing Office in Ontario

1. Completed Application for Registration (SR-LV-6)

2. A notarized affidavit. Refer to the information below for details that must be stated on affidavit.

3. Photocopies of bills of sale/receipts for main components (i.e.body, chassis/frame, engine, etc.), if available.

4. Permit(s) for vehicle(s) used to rebuild vehicle (for rebuilt/kit vehicle), if available.

5. Safety Standards Certificate for a passenger/commercial vehicle or a motorcycle. http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/900611_e.htm Please see MINIMUM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR ON-ROAD USE, below, for complete list of required equipment.

6. A Drive Clean Vehicle Emissions Pass Report is required for rebuilt vehicles, but not for kit cars. Effective January 1, 2002, kit cars (MODEL "KIT") are exempted from the Drive Clean program.

For more information on Drive Clean requirements, contact the Drive Clean Office at: Ministry of the Environment, Drive Clean Office, 40 St. Clair Ave. West - 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M4V 1M2, TEL: 1-888-758-2999 OR (905) 837-5839. Web site: http://www.driveclean.com/

7. Proof of empty weight.

8. Canada Customs Form or documentation with Customs Clearance stamp for parts (e.g. body of vehicle) which were obtained outside Canada. For more information on importation, please call the Registrar of Imported Vehicles at 1-888-848-8240 or (416) 626-1803, e-mail:mailto:info@riv.ca or visit their web site: http://www.riv.ca

9. Eight percent retail sales tax (RST) on the declared value of the completed vehicle. For parts you have already paid RST on, the bills of sale must be attached to the notarized affidavit as proof. For more information, please contact: your local Retail Sales Tax field office, or: Ministry of Finance, Retail Sales Tax Branch, Toll-Free Across Canada: 1-888-285-7815 or (905) 433-6170.

10. Fees: (a) To register the vehicle and attach plates when the vehicle owner has his/her own plates $10.00; (b) For new plates and permit $20.00. Note: For plate validation, the owner will be required to buy validation from the date of vehicle registration to the assigned validation expiry date. Fees will be calculated according to the class of vehicle and declaration(s) (e.g. Northern Ontario Resident).

11. Proof of identity for applicant who has never registered a plate or vehicle with the ministry.

[edit] Notarized affidavit requirements

A notarized affidavit is a sworn statement (also called a Statutory Declaration) made before a Commissioner of Oaths or a Notary Public. It is needed to establish vehicle ownership of the major component parts (body, chassis/frame and engine) used in the vehicle's reconstruction, and to provide a full vehicle description. All independently operated Ontario Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Offices may accept affidavits. http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/issoff.htm

[edit] Contents

1. Full legal name, address and signature of person making the declaration

2. Vehicle description - minimum requirements: make, model, model year, body type and class). If you are attaching permits and/or bills of sale for the component parts, please mention this. Where permits or bills of sale are not available, you must include the VIN and descriptions of all vehicles from which main component parts have been taken, and list previous owner information for such vehicles

3. Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), or a statement that a ministry approved/assigned VIN will be used

4. Year vehicle was rebuilt/completed

5. Statement that the vehicle was built with a kit, or is a kit car, by the legal owner of the vehicle, if applicable

6. Statement that the applicant is the legal and rightful owner, has the right to register the vehicle described, and how ownership was obtained.

[edit] Kit car notarized affidavit FAQ

1. What information does the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) require in the notarized affidavit about the kit car body (fibreglass or sheet metal body)?

Please provide the name, address, city, and province/state/country of the person or company where you purchased the kit car body, as well as the exact date of purchase [month, day and year]. The purchase date stated in your affidavit must match the date on the invoice/bill of sale for the kit car body.

2. If the previous owner/seller of the kit car body did not actually manufacture the kit car, what information does MTO require about the kit car manufacturer?

If the person or company who sold you the kit car body was NOT the actual manufacturer of the body, please list the name and address of the kit car manufacturer in your affidavit (documentation from the kit car manufacturer about the kit car may be attached to the affidavit, if available). The first four letters of the kit car manufacturer's name will be the MAKE of your kit car. The MAKE will need to be corrected, as well as correcting the MODEL to KIT, if the MAKE does not match the name of the kit car manufacturer.

3. Should I send in photographs of the kit car or copies of its specifications?

Please do not send in photographs of the vehicle. Photographs are not legal proof of the origin of the vehicle parts. As legal proof, MTO needs the complete vehicle description and where you got the parts listed in the affidavit. The only specification documents needed are documents listing the name and address of the kit car manufacturer, the name of the kit, and the vintage vehicle it is a replica of, if applicable.

4. Can I use the model year, make and model of the vehicle the kit car is a replica of, on the vehicle permit (e.g. 1923 Model T-bucket)?

No. A kit car is not a genuine antique or historic vehicle, even if a number of original antique or vintage parts were used in its construction. MTO is responsible for providing accurate information on our vehicle records, to support law enforcement and consumer protection. Using the model year, make and model of an antique or historic vehicle for registering a kit car could be considered fraud or misrepresentation. A notarized affidavit is a sworn statement, and you are liable for any fraudulent statements made in the affidavit. As vehicle description information, please do include in the affidavit, what make, model and model year the kit car is designed as a replica of.

5. Why can't I have the historic or antique model year, make and model on the vehicle permit, when this would make my vehicle more valuable, or would qualify my car for a special auto insurance rate?

A vehicle permit is designed to describe a vehicle accurately, not to determine its value. For problems obtaining affordable auto insurance, please contact the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO) for assistance at 1-800-668-0128 or (416) 250-7250. If you need proof of the kit car's actual value, you may wish to obtain an independent appraisal of the vehicle, from an appraiser knowledgeable about specialty and classic cars. Appraisals are recognized by insurance companies for evaluating insurance rates, and they can also be used to show potential purchasers of the vehicle.

6. What information does MTO need if I constructed the kit body myself ("homebuilt")?

If you made the body yourself [e.g. you purchased sheet metal panels to construct the body, and mounted it on a custom built or specialty frame/chassis], please explain in the affidavit exactly how you constructed the body and where [name, address, purchase date] you purchased the materials for the body. Attach the bill(s) of sale/invoice(s) for all materials used in the construction of the body. If you used a kit as a guide to construct the body, or used a specialty frame to construct the kit, this is still considered a kit car, and the MAKE will be whoever is the maker of the kit used as a guide to construct the vehicle. The kit maker is considered the manufacturer in this case, and MTO needs the name and address of the kit maker, and the date [month, day and year] you purchased the kit.

7. Do I need to list everything about the origin of the parts in the affidavit, when I have already attached copies of the bills of sale/invoices which give you that information?

Yes. The notarized affidavit is legal proof that you own the completed kit car, and you are making a sworn statement about where and when you obtained or purchased all the main component parts, and when you completed construction of the vehicle. The bills of sale/invoices are in support of the statements you have given in the affidavit, and the affidavit must be complete and accurate. MTO microfilms the affidavit and all your attached bills of sale/invoices and other documentation as a permanent record of this vehicle, for law enforcement purposes, and for the information of potential future owners of this vehicle.

8. Does MTO need the bills of sale for every part used to construct the kit car?

MTO needs to know from whom you purchased the materials used for the body, the chassis (a.k.a. frame), and the engine. You must give a reason in the affidavit why you don't have a bill of sale (e.g. bill of sale was lost, vendor didn't give you a receipt, etc.) for any one of, or any materials used in construction of, the three major component parts. Please also explain in the affidavit why any information is missing as to the name and address of the vendor or the date of purchase. If you bought these parts from a wrecking yard or an auto parts flea market, and the bill of sale is not available, MTO still needs the name and address of the wrecking yard or flea market and the date you purchased the parts. Please do not attach a Certificate of Origin, Title or NVIS, unless this is your only proof of purchase, and you do not have a bill of sale or invoice for the part in question. If you must use one of these three documents, please state in the affidavit which part of the vehicle it is for [e.g. kit car body], and clearly state that it is not for a completed vehicle.

9. What vehicle identification number (VIN) information is needed for the kit car body on the notarized affidavit?

Most kit car bodies do not have a VIN on the dashboard, or if there is a kit car VIN, it is not a 17-digit VIN, which complies with the VINA standards for VINs. Unless your kit car has a 17-digit VIN, MTO will give your vehicle an assigned 17-digit VIN starting with "ASD". If there is an existing kit car VIN, please list it in the affidavit. If there is no VIN, please mention that the kit car body does not have a VIN. If your kit car already was given a "RBT" or "HOM" VIN at the time of the original registration by the issuer, (kit cars should always be given an "ASD" assigned VIN) MTO will not change the existing VIN, we will just change the model to "KIT." Please mention the existing "ASD", "RBT" or "HOM" VIN in the affidavit, if applicable.

10. What vehicle identification number (VIN) information is needed for the chassis or frame on the notarized affidavit?

If the chassis (frame) used in the construction of the kit car has a VIN, you must include the chassis VIN in the affidavit, and also the model year, make and model of the vehicle where the chassis was taken from. MTO will also need the name, address of the previous owner of the chassis and the purchase date, and attach the bill of sale/invoice for the chassis. Please also attach to the affidavit, the vehicle permit for the chassis, if it is available. NOTE: The chassis VIN will not appear on the vehicle permit, but it is needed as background vehicle description information on the affidavit.

If the chassis/frame is a specialty frame without a VIN, please explain this in the affidavit, and the name, address and purchase date both of the vendor, and the name and address of the specialty frame manufacturer, if it is different from the vendor. If the chassis was custom built for a specific purpose or use, such as for military use only, please explain this in your affidavit as a reason there is no chassis VIN.

11. What vehicle identification number (VIN) information is needed for the engine on the notarized affidavit?

Please list the serial number of the engine in your affidavit, the model year, make, and model of the vehicle the engine is from, and if known, the VIN of the vehicle the engine was taken from. MTO also needs the name and address of the previous owner of the engine and purchase date. NOTE: Provided that MTO issues a vehicle permit with the model "KIT", the vehicle is exempt from Drive Clean emission inspection requirements, regardless of the engine's model year. A "KIT" vehicle permit will be issued, once your affidavit is accepted by MTO.

12. What information is needed for imported kit car parts?

If you imported the kit car parts disassembled, and completed construction of the vehicle in Ontario, you do not need a Vehicle Import 13-0132 form, because the Vehicle Import 13-0132 form is only supplied for fully assembled vehicles. Depending on when you imported the kit car parts into Canada, MTO will need either the document(s) with the Customs Clearance stamp, or if you imported it after March 1, 2002, you may have been given the new Vehicle Import Form 3 for parts. You must attach a photocopy of either one of these Customs forms to your affidavit, and mention in the affidavit, the date you imported the part(s) into Canada.

13. Why does MTO need me to mention in the affidavit the exact date that I completed construction of the kit car, and to state that I am the legal and rightful owner of the completed vehicle?

It usually takes several years from the date the owner purchases the kit car body and chassis to complete construction of the vehicle, and the completion date verifies the date on which the kit car was actually built. The statement that you are the legal and rightful owner of the completed vehicle is a standard statement, required at the end of every affidavit, which is used in support of vehicle registration. You are making a sworn statement that you are the legal owner, and you are verifying that all the parts used in its construction were obtained legally.

[edit] Vehicle safety standards requirements

The requirements for issuing a safety standards certificate (SSC) or a structural inspection certificate (SIC) (only used for vehicles/major component parts with major structural damage, branded as SALVAGE or REBUILT) needed for the registration of used motor vehicles, rebuilt vehicles, and kit cars, are governed by the minimum equipment standards in the Highway Traffic Act and its regulations.

http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Statutes/English/90h08_e.htm

Procedures for issuing the SSC or SIC are described in Ontario Regulation 611 made under the Highway Traffic Act. Online version:

http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/900611_e.htm

NOTE: for historic vehicles, Regulation 611, Schedule 5 specifies that: "Schedule 5 -inspection requirements and performance standards for historic vehicles 1. Each system and component mentioned in Schedules 1, 2 and 6, that is part of the historic vehicle, shall be inspected and tested and shall be in functional condition relative to its design, construction and operation."

A garage must be licensed as a Motor Vehicle Inspection Station in order to issue either of these certificates. Ontario Regulation 601 made under the Highway Traffic Act - online version: http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/900601_e.htm

[edit] Mininum safety standards for on-road use

Safety standards are listed in Regulation 611 - Safety Inspections under the Highway Traffic Act and the minimum equipment standards under the Highway Traffic Act. http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/DBLaws/Statutes/English/90h08_e.htm#BK105

Minimum equipment requirement references in the Highway Traffic Act are as follows:

Section 62 - Lamps & Turn Signals

Section 64 - Brakes

Section 66 - Mirrors, Windshield Wipers, Odometer & Fenders/Mudguards

Section 69 - Tires

Section 72 - Safety Glass

Section 75 - Muffler & horn

Section 103 - Reflectors

Section 106 - Seat belt assemblies

Section 142 - Brake lamp

Highway Traffic Act

http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Statutes/English/90h08_e.htm

And:

Highway Traffic Act RegulationsRegulation 587 Equipment: http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/900587_e.htm

Regulation 625 Tire Standards & Specifications: http://192.75.156.68/DBLaws/Regs/English/900625_e.htm

[edit] Emission inspection (Drive Clean) requirements

The Ministry of the Environment introduced the Drive Clean Program to address the adverse health effects of smog and pollutants in the atmosphere from motor vehicle emissions, with mandatory emission inspection and maintenance requirements. The Ministry of Transportation has a strong interest in the Drive Clean Program as part of our commitment to reduce the effects of greenhouse gas emissions, and supports the Ministry of the Environment by delivery of the program through its issuing network.

However, emission inspection regulations are the responsibility of the Ministry of the Environment, Drive Clean Office, and any questions concerning vehicle emission regulations should be directed to that office.

[edit] For more information on vehicle registration requirements, please contact:

Ministry of Transportation Licensing Administration Office 2680 Keele Street, Building A Downsview, ON M3M 3E6

Tel: 416-235-2999 or Toll-free: 1-800-387-3445 E-mail: lao@mto.gov.on.ca

[edit] Germany

[edit] New Zealand

For details on making a Hot Rod road legal in New Zealand, visit [1] and make contact with a certifier in your area.

More details are also available on the Land Transport Safety Authority website; [2]

There is also a 'Code of Construction manual' which is avalable through various outlets including the New Zealand Hot Rod Association ([3])

[edit] Norway

[edit] Norway emissions requirements

Warning Note: The following is from Hotrodders forum member [i]Vacuum[/i] with permission 00:14, 2 December 2012 (MST):

"Approving a modified car for street use in Norway is a difficult battle, but can be done. The rules are numerous and very complicated, and therefore not really fit for a Wiki article. Also I am not a lawyer and do not know them all in detail They can be viewed online, but only in Norwegian, as far as I know.

"The main thing to do is to immediately (before doing work on the car) contact the authorities (local traffic station) and ask what kind of testing and documentation they require for the modification you are thinking of. Some things just can not be done if you want the car registered. It pays off to have done your homework and read up on the basics so that you can ask intelligent questions. Also this will ensure that you get to talk to someone knowledgable, not just a random person at the front desk with no knowledge at all. This is important as the front-desk-guy's "standard answers" may not be correct for your vehicle, especially if it is an older car.

"There are major differences in laws for cars registered before and after 1970, and even larger differences if it's earlier than 1942. There are also smaller differences from year to year. This is because laws in Norway by consitution can not be retroactive, so as new laws (including the major revisions to vehicle laws in 1942 and 1970) are added, these do not affect cars already registred. Note that it's the 1st registration date of the vehicle in Norway and not the manufacturing date (or registration date in another country) that counts. If the car was imported this will probably affect whether or not it can be modified (ask local traffic station for details).

"Now, the general idea in Norway - at least for cars registered after 1970 - is that any modifications must be approved by manufacturer or a "competent independent laboratory", which in practice is TÜV in Germany. There might be some leeway depending on which person you talk to when approving your car. Some traffic stations are very rigid and will require documents on everything, while others will judge simpler modifications themselves.

"I have only personally dealt with cars from 1970 and later, but generally I can confirm that it gets significantly easier the older the car is (fewer rules to abide by). Do not assume that "anything goes" even if the car is older, though.

"For American cars I must stress that one contacts AMCAR, a large organization in Norway working for American car enthusiasts on both political and technical issues. They will know what needs to be done, and have tons of documents and information in their databases. The local traffic stations will often be helpful as well, if you are open about your intentions and involve them in the planning process.

"I would like to add that there will soon be a new set of laws specifically aimed at hotrods/kitcars, etc. (when the modifications are considering up-building of cars/building of a new car, rather than just a modification). These are not ready yet, but should be out in 2013, according to AMCAR."


[edit] UK

[edit] Commercial titling services

Need details on this. How do they work? How do their differ state-to-state or region-to-region? Legality? Cost?

Examples:


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