How to remove an ignition key lock

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by: Alittle1, Cobalt327, Crashfarmer, Crosley, Jon, The Flyin Wop
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Contents

[edit] Overview

If you lose your keys or buy a car with no keys you can hire a locksmith or change the lock yourself.

[edit] General Motors

GM started keeping records of key codes back in 1935. GM dealers have access to GM codes on file for the LAST SEVEN YEARS only! Some key codes can be found on the broadcast sheets delivered with the car or found inside the car's rear seat area or over the fuel tank. You can just go to your dealer with your proof of ownership of that particular vehicle' and they can make you a key or go to your friendly neighbourhood locksmith to have him cut a key to code or make a key if none is available.

[edit] Remove center

Steeringwheelcenter.jpg

[edit] Remove nut

Steeringsocket.jpg

[edit] Pull wheel

Pullwheel.jpg

Remove the horn cap, attached to the cap will be a wire that goes to a plastic fitting that is removed by depressing it and giving it a quarter turn CCW to remove it. Remove the 7/8" nut from the steering shaft. Use a puller to remove the steering wheel. They usually come right off but occasionally you run into a stubborn one. A light tap with a hammer on the end of the puller will jar those loose.

Wheelpulled.jpg

[edit] Remove column lock

Removecolumnlock.jpg

This part requires using a special tool that pushes in on the column lock plate so you can remove the wire clip. Although this can be done without the tool, the tool makes it considerably easier.

Some of the shafts had a metric thread on the shaft so remember to use the proper attachment screw in piece when installing the lock plate clip remover.

Removing the little spring wire clip is always the most aggravating part of changing the lock.

Columnlockoff.jpg

[edit] Remove emergency flasher switch

Emergflash.jpg


Remove the Phillips screw holds the turn signal lever in place.

[edit] Loosen turn signal

Turnsignal.jpg

Remove the three Phillips screws that hold the switch. You may have to turn the switch to get at the bottom one.

Gently pull up on the switch plate to loosen the wiring harness so that it slides over the steering shaft.

[edit] Pull lockset

Buzzswitch.jpg

Remove the buzzer switch and spring holder.

Removesetscrew.jpg

Remove the torx or Phillips set screw. (Older GM columns have a push clip that must be depressed to remove the ignition.)

Removelock.jpg

Removelock2.jpg

Remove the lock. The ignition switch is located at the base of the column and connects to the lock mechanism by way of a rod.

[edit] Install new lock

Just reverse the process.

[edit] Chrysler

Chrysler used the GM Saginaw tilt column for a period of years from 1968 to 1986, it removes the same as the GM is stated above, except it is a clip type of ignition.

Chryco offers three types of ignition columns, it is best left to a locksmith to change these ignitions as special processes are involved. Also there are easier ways to 'key alike' a auto if you want the same key to operate the doors and ignition. Most Chrycos have a key code on the door cylinders.

[edit] Ford

Most older Ford ignition locking systems require you to have a working key in order for you to remove the ignition lock. If a working key is available, turn the ignition lock into the 'ON' position and look for a poke hole in the lock housing to push in a pin retainer, then pull out the cylinder to remove the ignition.

Newer systems require the use of professional services from a locksmith. Ten cut locks only contain 6 cuts of a total of ten cuts, whereas the door cylinder will contain the other four cuts to get a fully working key.

[edit] Others

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