Automobile body and frame rotisserie

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by: CDJr, Cobalt327, Jon, Klutchmaster427, Rich TFS, Schnitz, VckE1r
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FrameOff© BodyMaster™ system








Contents

[edit] Purpose of a rotisserie

  1. To remove the accumulation of dirt, rust, grease, etc. from vehicles chosen for restoration or rodding. Not suited for ordinary servicing and repair. Ramps and lifts are better suited for this.
  2. Gives access to all areas for cleaning and repair.
  3. Eliminates hours of looking up into nooks and crannies or laying beneath the underside of a vehicle while scraping, brushing, sanding, and doing repairs.

[edit] Design parameters and considerations

  1. Load -- consider weight and flex of body. If the load gets outside of the base, the whole thing tips over.
  2. Swing -- consider shape and dimensions of body and the space in which it will rotate about its center of gravity. Pivots must be in line. Anything on a radius from either pivot will reduce the swing capacity; distance of pivot from obstructions determines swing capacity.
  3. If the vehicle is not braced properly especially a convertible you can easily bend or twist the body.


[edit] Building a rotisserie

  1. Materials -- steel pipe, tubing, angle, plate, bolts, welding rods or wire
    1. Acquisition of materials -- salvage, new
  2. Construction methods -- weld, bolt
  3. Tools needed
    1. welder
    2. torch
    3. drill
    4. saw
    5. layout tools (scribe, awl, soapstone, marker, square, level, straight edge)
    6. wrenches
  4. Work area

[edit] Usage

  1. Safe attachment of load
  2. Safe elevation of load
  3. Test and inspect

[edit] Other uses for rotisserie

  1. Storage
  2. I built my very simple rotisserie and after taking my '68 Firebird off of it 2 years later, I cut the tops off, added casters, welded them together, and VOILA!...instant rollaround car stands. Of course, the rotisserie only made the rear part, I made the front part from some spare steel I had. Here's a photo of it...

100 2798.jpg


Rotiss2.jpg

This is my first rotisserie I had built over 10 years ago. I designed it with pneumatic tires and steering to allow mobility on rough outdoor surfaces and ease of trailer loading (back then I moved my vehicles around between home and work fabrication shops). This particular rotisserie was sized so that when the body is flipped roof up, I can practically work underneath the car while standing straight (notice a wide track to enhance stability). The rotisserie can be disconnected in the middle for painting large parts.-Rich TFS

[edit] References

Hotrodders.com Knowledge Base
Discussion on Hotrodders.com

[edit] External links


You can edit this article right now.

Just click the "edit" tab at the top of this page, or click one of the [edit] links to the right of an article section.


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